Vai al contenuto
Accedi per seguirlo  
-{-Legolas-}-

ASM-135A (ASAT)

Messaggi consigliati

Interessante documentazione sulla storia del programma ASAT.

 

http://www.svengrahn...AT/F15ASAT.html

 

" ....By September 1985, all was finally ready for a test against an orbiting satellite. On Sept. 13, Maj. Wilbert D. "Doug" Pearson, the director of the F-15 ASAT CTF, took off on a crucial mission that required him to fly an extraordinarily exacting profile in order to arrive at a precise firing location at exactly the right time. Flying at Mach 1.22 some 200 miles west of Vandenberg Air Force Base, he executed a 3.8g pull-up to a climb angle of 65 degrees. The missile automatically launched itself at 38,100 ft. Minutes later, orbiting peacefully 345 miles above the Pacific Ocean, an obsolete satellite named P78-1 was suddenly shattered into pieces. Pearson had become the world's first pilot ever to shoot down a satellite. To this day, now Maj. Gen. Doug Pearson remains, as Air Force Materiel Command Commander Gen. Lester Lyles recently observed, the first and only "space ace ..."

 

f_15_asat.jpg

 

Per approfondire: Aerei Militari F-15 ASAT

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Ne avevo letto su "Aerei da Combattimento" e c'era un bella immagine, appena la trovo la posto

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

ho sempre amato l'F-15 ASAT... un vero caccia da Guerre Stellari!!! il programma è stato completamente terminato ora? Fino agli anni 90 gli asat erano conservati anche se non più operativi...

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

ASM-135, avveniristico missile aviolanciato anti-satellite

 

In 1979, the USAF issued a contract to LTV Aerospace to begin work on the ALMV. The LTV Aerospace design featured a multi-stage missile with a infrared homing kinetic energy warhead.[8]

 

The ASM-135 was launched from an F-15A in a supersonic zoom climb. The F-15's mission computer and heads-up display were modified to provide steering directions for the pilot.[8]

 

A modified Boeing AGM-69 SRAM missile with a Lockheed Propulsion Company LPC-415 solid propellant two pulse rocket engine was used as the first stage of the ASM-135 ASAT.[9]

 

The LTV Aerospace Altair 3 was used as the second stage of the ASM-135.[10] The Altair 3 used the Thiokol FW-4S solid propellant rocket engine. The Altair 3 stage was also used as the fourth stage for the Scout rocket [10] and had been previously used in both the Bold Orion and HiHo anti-satellite weapons efforts.[3] The Altair was equipped with Hydrazine fueled thrusters that could be used to point the missile towards the target satellite.

 

LTV Aerospace also provided the third stage for the ASM-135 ASAT. This stage was called Miniature Homing Vehicle (MHV) intercepter. Prior to being deployed the second stage was used to spin the MHV up to approximately 30 revolutions per second and point the MHV towards the target.[11]

 

A Honeywell ring laser gyroscope was used for spin rate determination and to obtain an inertial timing reference before the MHV separated from the second stage.[11] The infrared sensor was developed by Hughes Research Laboratories. The sensor utilized a strip detector where four strips of Indium Bismuth were arranged in a cross and four strips were arranged as logarithmic spirals. As the detector was spun, the infrared target's position could be measured and as it crossed the strips in the sensors field of view. The MHV infrared detector was cooled by liquid helium from a dewar installed in place of the F-15's gun ammunition drum and from a smaller dewar located in the second stage of the ASM-135. Cryogenic lines from the second stage were retracted prior to the spin up of the MHV.[11]

 

The MHV guidance system solely tracked targets in the field of view of the infrared sensor, but did not determine altitude, attitude, or range to the target. Direct Proportional Line of Sight guidance used information from the detector to maneuver and null out any line-of-sight change. A Bang-bang control system was used to fire 56 full charge "divert" and lower thrust 8 half charge "end-game" solid rocket motors arranged around the circumference of the MHV. The half charge 8 "end-game" motors were used to perform finer trajectory adjustments just prior to intercepting the target satellite. Four pods at the rear of the MHV contained small attitude control rocket motors. These motors were used to dampen off center rotation by the MHV.[11]

On 21 December 1982, an F-15A was used to perform the first captive carry ASM-135 test flight from the Air Force Flight Test Center, Edwards AFB, California in the United States.[7]

 

On 20 August 1985 President Reagan authorized a test against a satellite. The test was delayed to provide notice to the United States Congress. The target was the Solwind P78-1, an orbiting solar observatory that was launched on 24 February 1979.[7]

 

On 13 September 1985, Maj. Wilbert D. "Doug" Pearson, flying the "Celestial Eagle" F-15A 76-0084 launched an ASM-135 ASAT about 200 miles (322 km) west of Vandenberg Air Force Base and destroyed the Solwind P78-1 satellite flying at an altitude of 345 miles (555 km). Prior to the launch the F-15 flying at Mach 1.22 executed a 3.8g zoom climb at an angle of 65 degrees. The ASM-134 ASAT was automatically launched at 38,100 ft while the F-15 was flying at Mach .934.[7] The 30 lb (13.6 kg) MHV collided with the 2,000 lb (907 kg) Solwind P78-1 satellite at closing velocity of 15,000 mph (24,140 km/h).[9]

 

 

An F-15 Eagle launches the ASM-135 during the final test, which destroyed the Solwind P78-1 satellite.NASA learned of U.S. Air Force plans for the Solwind ASAT test in July 1985. NASA modeled the effects of the test. This model determined that debris produced would still be in orbit in the 1990s. It would force NASA to enhance debris shielding for its planned space station.[12]

 

Earlier the U.S. Air Force and NASA had worked together to develop a Scout-launched target vehicle for ASAT experiments. NASA advised the U.S. Air Force on how to conduct the ASAT test to avoid producing long-lived debris. However, congressional restrictions on ASAT tests intervened.[12]

 

In order to complete an ASAT test before an expected Congressional ban took effect (as it did in October 1985), the DoD determined to use the existing Solwind astrophysics satellite as a target.[12]

 

NASA worked with the DoD to monitor the effects of the tests using two orbital debris telescopes and a reentry radar deployed to Alaska.[12]

 

NASA assumed the torn metal would be bright. Surprisingly, the Solwind pieces turned out to appear so dark as to be almost undetectable. Only two pieces were seen. NASA Scientists theorized that the unexpected Solwind darkening was due to carbonization of organic compounds in the target satellite; that is, when the kinetic energy of the projectile became heat energy on impact, the plastics inside Solwind vaporized and condensed on the metal pieces as soot.[12]

 

NASA utilized U.S. Air Force infrared telescopes to show that the pieces were warm with heat absorbed from the Sun. This added weight to the contention that they were dark with soot and not reflective. The pieces decayed quickly from orbit, implying a large area-to-mass ratio. According to NASA, as of January 1998, 8 of 285 trackable pieces remained in orbit.[12]

Modificato da fabiomania87
Unite le discussioni.

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

sinceramente non sono sicuro di essere nel forum giusto per parlare di armi aria-spazio...

sapreste darmi più informazioni su questo tipo di missili e gli aerei che ne fanno uso (oltre l'f-15) ???

grazie in anticipo per le risposte

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Argomento interessante.

 

In teoria qualsiasi missile che buca l'atmosfera può portare armamento antisatellite, un laser, un dardo cinetico o roba simile.

Ma le armi nello spazio sono (o erano) proibite.

 

Al momento non so darti sigle o altri dati

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Se non ricordo male esistono, e sono in vigore, Trattati internazionali che proibiscno lo "schieramento" di armi nello Spazio;non ricordo il testo esatto, ma sicuramente si riferisce a armi "persitentemente" nello Spazio, quindi o in orbita, oppure sulla superficie di corpi celesti (ipotesi questa molto improbabile). Un missile "SAM-simile" capace di arrampicarsi fino alle quote orbitali, ma NON orbitante esso stesso, a mio parere potrebbe ritenersi al di fuori da quanto esplicitamente proibito nei Trattati, perchè non sarebbe un oggetto persistentemente nello Spazio.

Negli anni '60-70 negli USA esisteva il sistema Nike-Zeus, sviluppo del più famoso Nike-Hercules, accreditato di poter neutralizzare oggetti orbitanti fino a circa 500km di quota, e nel '79 l'amministrazione Carter autorizzò lo sviluppo di un missile anti-satellite aviolanciabile, che assunse poi la denominazione ufficiale di ASM-135, citato anche da Tom Clancy, e a quanto si sa avrebbe dovuto avere come bersaglio privilegiato i satelliti RORSAT da ricognizione ognitempo.

E' del 2008 l'esperimento anti-satellite dello SM-3

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Prima dello sviluppo dell’ASM-135 ASAT, era già stato condotto un esperimento con un Bold Orion (WS-199) in versione modificata lanciato da un B-47, che aveva dimostrato la fattibilità di un’arma antisatellite lanciata da un aereo. Ottime informazioni sono reperibili qui:

 

http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/m-135.html

 

http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/app4/ws-199.html

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASM-135_ASAT

 

Anche i russi avevano un progetto simile. La variante MiG-31D avrebbe dovuto essere armata con un singolo missile antisatellite. Lo sviluppo, partito agli inizi degli anni ’80, ha portato alla modifica di sei velivoli. I lavori sul missile non sono, apparentemente, proseguiti ed il progetto è stato abbandonato.

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

A parte il test con il Bold Orion, solo dimostrativo, sono stati lanciati 5 ASM-135 nel corso del breve servizio del missile. Nel 1985 è stato effettuato il primo ed unico attacco "reale" ad un satellite, abbattuto ad oltre 500 km di quota.

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

A parte il test con il Bold Orion, solo dimostrativo, sono stati lanciati 5 ASM-135 nel corso del breve servizio del missile. Nel 1985 è stato effettuato il primo ed unico attacco "reale" ad un satellite, abbattuto ad oltre 500 km di quota.

 

Non avevo mai sentito questa storia, anzi pensavo che l'arma non fosse mai stata effettivamente provata.

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Rimanendo in tempi più recenti , il 21 febbraio 2008 la US Navy ha distrutto un vecchio satellite del NRO con un missile lanciato da un incrociatore Ticonderoga:

 

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSN1930844420080221   (

)

 

Il test è stato quasi certamente una risposta ad un precedente analogo test svolto dalla Cina il 11 Gennaio 2007 in cui era stato distrutto un vecchio satellite meteorologico:

 

http://www.globalsecurity.org/space/world/china/asat.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

grazie sempre ben documentat...i potreste dirmi da quali aerei sono aviolanciabili?

grazie

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

La Cina utilizza ancora grossi missili balistici come vettori, mentre gli USA possono lanciare da una base mobile....sul mare.

Notevole come risultato

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti
grazie sempre ben documentat...i potreste dirmi da quali aerei sono aviolanciabili?

grazie

 

beh c'è il sistema asat basato sull F-15 ,ma è tecnologia di moltissimo tempo fa , ne parla persino clancy in Uragano rosso

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Anche io conoscevo l'ASAT... Ma allora lo hanno già pensionato?

Modificato da Sky Knight

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

in realtà non è mai entrato in servizio. il progrmma, benchè di successo, fu cancellato nel 1988.

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

dimenticavo : si pure solo a scopo pubblicitario, sia dassoult che consorzio eurofighter affermano che i loro aerei potrebbero condurre una missione asat , non specificando però con che missile

 

 

ad oggi in europa non mi risulta sviluppata un' arma asat , tranne l aster 30 block II ABM che dovrebbe avere prestazioni migliori del SM3

Modificato da cama81

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

avendoci il buon Gianvito viziatoci con un altro interessantissimo aritcolo, che potete leggere qui: http://www.loneflyer.com/?p=1908
due domande sono obbligatorie:

1. la sperimentazione e/o l'uso di Nike Zeus e Thor in tale ruolo.

2. si parla di limitare la traccia infrarossa dello MKV perchè? davano fastidio alla telemetria?


Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Il Nike Zeus (DM-15S) è stato impiegato dal 1962 al 1966 nel ruolo antisatellite dall’atollo di Kwajalein, dopo numerosi test positivi. Era in grado di colpire satelliti a 280 km di quota (altre fonti parlano di 560 km) impiegando una testata di 1 Mt.

 

Il successivo Thor LV-2D, operativo ufficialmente dal 1964 al 1970 sull’atollo Johnson, ma mantenuto in “stand by” fino al 1975, era molto più potente, potendo colpire satelliti a 700 km di quota. Durante uno dei test, con una testata termonucleare reale, l’effetto EMP ha provocato danni a molti satelliti civili. Il sistema aveva due missili pronti al lancio con un preavviso di 14-30 giorni, i componenti andavano trasportati per via aerea da Vandenberg. La testata W-49 aveva un raggio efficace di 8 km. Il successivo programma 922 per un derivato convenzionale del Thor a guida infrarossa non ha avuto seguito.

 

Le particelle combuste di propellente dell’MKV, a differenza di quel che accade nell’aria, tendevano a mantenersi “calde” molto a lungo, questo avrebbe potuto distrarre il sensore infrarosso. Lo sviluppo di un combustibile adeguato ha richiesto molte prove.

Modificato da Gian Vito

Condividi questo messaggio


Link al messaggio
Condividi su altri siti

Crea un account o accedi per commentare

Devi essere un utente per poter lasciare un commento

Crea un account

Registrati per un nuovo account nella nostra comunità. è facile!

Registra un nuovo account

Accedi

Hai già un account? Accedi qui.

Accedi ora
Accedi per seguirlo  

×