Jump to content
easy

AgustaWestland AW-101 - discussione ufficiale

Recommended Posts

Un articolo/intervista ad un responsabile di Lockeed Martin, che tra le varie opzioni ad US Navy ha proposto la rinuncia all'Increment 2 poichè già la prima fase è già abbondante, ovviamente aumentandone i numeri e fornendo cifre gustose

 

da uk.reuters.com

 

INTERVIEW-Navy could save "billions" on helicopter-Lockheed

 

By Andrea Shalal-Esa

 

WASHINGTON, March 2 (Reuters) - The U.S Navy could save "billions of dollars" on a new presidential helicopter if it sticks with the design of the first nine aircraft in the program, Jeff Bantle, the Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N) executive in charge of the program, said on Monday.

 

Bantle told Reuters there had been some cost growth on the first phase of the VH-71 presidential helicopter, but the lion's share of cost overruns facing the program were associated with design changes in the second phase.

 

The program was thrust into the limelight last week when President Barack Obama cited it as an example of the procurement process "gone amok."

 

It is expected to get more attention at a hearing on Tuesday before the Senate Armed Services Committee, whose top leaders have introduced legislation to crack down on cost overruns and schedule delays in major weapons programs.

 

The Navy last month told Congress that the helicopter program, initially slated to cost $6.1 billion, would cost at least 50 percent more. Federal law requires the Pentagon to terminate any program with such large cost growth unless it is needed for national security reasons and meets other criteria.

 

The Pentagon's outgoing chief arms buyer, John Young, projected the cost overrun almost a year ago, but mounting budget pressures and the global financial crisis have increased the likelihood that the program will be pared back, according to analysts and industry executives.

 

"Clearly there is more financial pressure on the economy. The environment definitely has changed," Bantle agreed in a telephone interview, although he said there had not been much discussion about halting the program entirely.

 

Bantle said Lockheed was working closely with the Navy as it explored a range of possible options to cut costs on the program, including a move to buy more of the first phase, or "Increment One" helicopters. He said Lockheed had prepared rough cost evaluations for the Navy on various options.

 

Much would depend on exactly what configuration the Navy wanted for he next batch of helicopters, but it was clear that the first helicopters would be cheaper, Bantle said. To carry more equipment and people, the second batch of helicopters will be modified with longer rotor blades and a lengthened tail, adding significant cost.

 

"Obviously that would be significantly cheaper than doing a full up Increment Two. You would save billions of dollars."

 

He said the final price tag for the program could be "in the ballpark" of the original $6.1 billion, but it was difficult to say anything more specific until the Navy decided how to configure the next batch of helicopters.

 

The current production cost for the helicopters was around $120 million, including spares and support equipment, but excluding research and development costs, Bantle said.

Bantle said the Lockheed team would finish building the last two aircraft in the first phase by May, a little more than four years after Lockheed first won the contract, a feat he called "pretty amazing" in an aircraft development program.

 

Next the helicopters will be outfitted with specific military mission equipment and run through a rigorous set of flight tests, before starting to ferry the president in April 2011, about 18 months after the initial deployment date.

 

Bantle said he expected the Pentagon to complete its review of the program within the next three to five months.

 

Lockheed and its chief subcontractor on the project, AgustaWestland, a unit of Italy's Finmeccanica (SIFI.MI), won the contract in January 2005. They beat Sikorsky Aircraft, a United Technologies Corp (UTX.N) unit that makes the current "Marine One" helicopters used to transport the president.

Calcolatrice alla mano:

 

120x23= 2,76 miliardi di $ di costi di produzione per i 23 elicotteri previsti per la seconda fase.

 

Attualmente le cifre indicano 7,5 miliardi di $ il costo della seconda fase. In pratica un risparmio di 5 miliardi di $, mica bruscolini. In questo modo si ha una flotta nuova di trinca ed omogenea. Stranamente questa cifra non è riportata sui media americani...

 

Se questa non è la scelta più conveniente, certo non lo è per Sikorsky :asd: :asd:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ma l'AW 101 della marina,quello con il muso rosso e la fusoliera verdastra, è in condizioni di volare o non lo farà più?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nelle precedenti risposte,circa nella nona pagina si parlava di questo elicottero e si diceva che non volasse più.La mia domanda era se potevate confermare che siamo con un elicottero in meno e che questo,date le sue condizioni non possa riuscire a volare.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

è un prototipo non più in uso non un operativo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Embraer dovrebbe parlare di questo AW101:

 

20090211_Sarzana_eh101_005.jpg

 

Quello con il muso rosso, che dovrebbe essere uno dei 101 di pre-serie utilizzato per le prove, e precisamente il PP-7.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Esatto.Ma la marina militare lo ha mai fatto entrare in servizio dopo che la progettazione di questo elicottero era finita?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A parte che dovrebbe essere il PP-6, il PP-7 è con la rampa, come tutti gli aerei di sviluppo non è stato convertito in operativo, probabilmente costava meno uno nuovo che non aveva oltre 10 anni sul groppone.

Solitamente i prototipi finito il loro lavoro finiscono in un museo, cosa già accaduta per alcuni DA del programma EFA.

 

Solo in rarissimi casi un prototipo viene aggiornato e messo in servizio attivo, un esempio il B-2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Un'altra domanda:

come mai sugli elicotteri della marina militare c'è quella roba grigio scura che forse è legata ai motori e che sugli AW-101 della Royal Navy non c'è?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Per parte grigio scura intendo quella nella parte finale dopo i motori e prima del rotore di coda

 

 

 

doppio post, +10%

Edited by vorthex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Se dici il grigio scuro sul trave di coda...è l'affumicatura dovuta agli scarichi dei motori, si vede che a RN li ripitturano più spesso.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

altra news interessante che ad occhio segnerà la morte dell'VH-71B (increment 2)

L'unica è sperare nella conversione di parte dell'ordine in VH-71A.

 

da Bloomberg.com

 

Lockheed Presidential Helicopter Now Double Its Projected Cost

By Tony Capaccio

Last Updated: March 5, 2009 15:07 EST

 

March 5 (Bloomberg) -- Lockheed Martin Corp.’s presidential helicopter program is now projected to cost $13 billion, more than twice its original estimate, according to the Pentagon.

 

This latest estimate, prepared for congressional defense committees, is more bad news for a program President Barack Obama last month called “an example of the procurement process gone amok.”

 

The Pentagon, in a 15-page update on the program, blames the increased cost on delays and “unanticipated” work.

 

The revised estimate -- 113 percent above the original projection of $6.1 billion -- would bring the average cost per helicopter to at least $470 million, including the expense for research and development. That’s more than Lockheed’s F-22, the most expensive fighter aircraft in U.S. history.

 

The president has vowed to curb billions of dollars in wasteful spending at the Defense Department, and the Pentagon is reviewing weapons programs for possible cancellation or delay as it puts together a fiscal 2010 budget.

 

Obama, at a White House summit on fiscal responsibility Feb. 23, suggested he doesn’t need a new helicopter.

 

The current version “Marine One,” as the presidential helicopter is known, is “perfectly adequate” and doesn’t need to be replaced, he said.

 

Richard Aboulafia, an aircraft analyst with the Teal Group in Fairfax, Virginia, said the helicopter “was designed in a different budget environment when costs didn’t matter.”

 

“It’s probably possible to design something” based on the Lockheed design “that does three-quarters of the job at one- quarter the price,” he said.

 

Won Contract in 2005

 

Bethesda, Maryland-based Lockheed won the contract to build a new fleet in January 2005. The program called for building as many as 28 helicopters with a goal of having the first five ready “no earlier than September 2010,” according to the document sent to lawmakers last month. This goal has now been pushed back 18 months.

 

The Navy planned to field an upgraded version, which would have more sophisticated communications as well as the most advanced defenses against missiles and other threats -- by December 2017. That date has slipped two years to December 2019.

The current presidential fleet has some helicopters from United Technologies Corp.’s Sikorsky unit that are 40 years old.

 

The new program has been the source of disagreements among the company, the Navy and the White House Military Office over performance requirements.

 

The Lockheed aircraft is based on the design of the EH101 helicopter produced by Agustawestland, a unit of Finmeccanica SpA of Italy. Textron Inc.’s Bell Helicopter unit is a major subcontractor.

 

Navy spokesman Lieutenant Clay Doss said it would be “inappropriate to comment” during the current review. Lockheed Martin spokesman Troy Scully had no immediate comment on the cost estimate.

 

E' da chiedersi cosa hanno chiesto di integrare visto che le spese di sviluppo stanno sfiorando tranquillamente i 9 miliardi di $ considerando che il costo fly-away dell'elicottero è di 120 milioni.

 

Tanto per dare un paragone, lo sviluppo dell'F-35 è stimato in 40 miliardi di $, ma almeno spalmabili su 4000 aerei e non 28

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scusate ma di chi è l'articolo dell'Ayatollah One? Ma chi diavolo ha avuto il coraggio di scrivere quell'accrocco di cazzate? La pelle si rizza a me leggendo una roba del genere! :furioso: Come minimo AW dovrebbe denunciarli per diffamazione ed incompetenza fraudolenta!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nella proposta di tagli da 20 miliardi di $ che è iniziata a circolare ieri c'è ovviamente il VH-71B <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

La famosa foto da dove abbiamo imparato che anche il secondo HEW ha il radome montato....

 

EDIT: questa è divertente; ho risposto al post di Little (in fondo a pg 12) pensando che fosse l'ultima pagina della discussione e invece mi sono perso la pag 13

Edited by Rick86

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scusate ma alla fine vi è ancora qualche minima speranza per il Marine One by AW?

Edited by Hicks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ho letto sul giornale di brescia di ieri un articolo in cui riportava la notizia che Obama ha deciso di acquistare il l'VH101 nella configurazione attuale senza ulteriori modifiche e gadget.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Beh sarebbe la cosa più intelligente, però servirebbe una fonte un pò più affidabile.

In effetti se il costo è lievitato così tanto è solo perchè precedentemente ci si voleva installare il mondo. Direi che il mezzo di partenza è più che collaudato, come macchina intendo. Poi, riguardo all'avionica, mi sono abituato a leggere di ritardi su ritardi per integrazione e cavoli vari...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Beh sarebbe la cosa più intelligente, però servirebbe una fonte un pò più affidabile.

Sull'attuale bozza per risparmiare i 20 miliardi di $ il VH-71B è MORTO. Ciò non esclude che vengano ordinati ulteriori VH-71A il cui costo è di circa 120 milioni di $ (x23= 2,76 miliardi) contro l'Increment 2 stimata ormai in 9 miliardi di $

Io so che gli USA compreranno i 9 VH101 già fabbricati,ma non compreranno gli ultimi 11 ordinati.
Dei 9, 4 sono Test Vehicle ovvero prototipi e solo 5 verranno usati effettivamente come Marine One. Il 2o lotto non prevede 11 elicotteri ma 23 con qualche TV credo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dei 9, 4 sono Test Vehicle ovvero prototipi e solo 5 verranno usati effettivamente come Marine One. Il 2o lotto non prevede 11 elicotteri ma 23 con qualche TV credo.

 

Grazie del chiarimento,aggiornerò subito il mio archivio evidentemente errato.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Volevo solo dire che comunque i piloti dei Marines sono ansiosi di ricevere il VH-71,che reputano un'ottima macchina veramente.

L'articolo postato un paio di pagine fà invece è spazzatura che andrebbe punita severamente per vie legali a mio parere,sia nei confronti di chi l'ha scritto e sia nei confronti di chi l'ha pubblicato in USA e in Italia.

 

Credo che comunque la scelta di cancellare il VH-71B sia abbastanza sensata,e se il numero di elicotteri venisse confermato convertedo l'ordine solo in VH-71A l'Agusta-Westland non ci andrebbe a perdere piu' di tanto.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, Agusta non ci perde troppo in ogni caso a livello economico, i contratti sono strutturati in modo che una rescissione immotivata vada a costare tanto all'acquirente, il pericolo è che queste cavolate vengano considerate vere da qualcuno costando prestigio ad AW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...