Jump to content
Guest intruder

US Air Force

Recommended Posts

Guest intruder

Se non ho appena fatto uno dei miei soliti errori nell'uso del motore di ricerca, non esiste una pagina ufficiale dedicata alla cara, vecchia, irascibile US Air Force.

 

 

356px-Seal_of_the_US_Air_Force.svg.png

 

Sperando di non fare il solito errore, provvedo alla bisogna, e comincio postando questo interessante articolo:

 

 

Recasting the Air Force

 

By Robert S. Dudney

Editor in Chief

 

In recent weeks, the Chief of Staff laid out some key, force-defining principles.

 

Dissatisfied with the recent direction of the Air Force, Gen. Norton A. Schwartz, the service Chief of Staff, has begun charting a new path. He discussed some of its principal features during a series of public statements over the past few weeks.

 

It is an impressive body of thought—clear, coherent, and defensible. With his selection as Chief last June, in the wake of a leadership shakeup, General Schwartz became the authoritative voice on Air Force matters, so his statements offer the best preview of likely coming events.

 

He wants an air arm with broader and more-balanced capabilities, integrated far more tightly into the joint force. Unlike some who swing wildly at service "next-war-itis," he surveys threats and programs fully, not in isolated pieces.

 

The general spoke at length to a Feb. 17 meeting of the Defense Writers Group in Washington, D.C., and in a more limited fashion to the National Defense Industrial Association, also in Washington. The Chief laid out some key force-defining principles. Among them:

 

Balance. General Schwartz noted, "Clearly, there is a need" for USAF to build strength "in the irregular warfare area"—with wars in Iraq and Afghanistan as guideposts—even at the expense of conventional forces. One case in point: intelligence-surveillance-reconnaissance. Today, USAF can fly 34 UAV orbits over a region, but in 2011, the number will be 50—"a major commitment," he says. USAF will also offer support, training, and advice to irregular war "partners" overseas. "It’s fundamentally a question of balance," said the General.

 

Jointness. General Schwartz vowed to support US ground forces in today’s wars with "whatever is needed, whatever it takes," adding that, in the past, some airmen had a different view. The remark seemed to align the Chief with Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates’ persistent criticism of the Air Force.

 

Fighters. For years, USAF has stated a need for 381 F-22 fighters—enough for 10 squadrons (one for each air expeditionary force) plus backup and training jet aircraft. General Schwartz has approved a lower number, said by insiders to be about 240. It seems that General Schwartz used a new metric. "The question is, and has always been, the size of the major combat operations that are contemplated [and] their simultaneity," said the Chief—not the rotational need. "What was a low-risk number at 381 is a moderate-risk number now," he claimed.

 

Budgets. USAF has often warned of a $20-billion-a-year gap between its true needs and its actual budget. General Schwartz indicated that there will be no more such warnings. "If we want something, we’re going to pay for it" with allocated funds, he said. He added, however, that "we will certainly not be timid about making the case for what we think is needed."

 

Troops. The push to cut end strength—today, about 330,000—is dead. "We were headed to 316,000" airmen, noted General Schwartz, but "we’re going to end up at about 332,000—maybe a little bit higher." Even that may be too low; according to the Chief, the Air Force could make a case for 350,000 troops, but "we ain’t going to get there." To man the most critical areas, USAF will shift airmen from missions of less demand. He expects there will be "some friction associated with that." The Chief didn’t specify which missions would suffer losses of personnel.

 

Space. The Air Force needs to review the wisdom of building "bigger and more complex" space systems, said the Chief. It could be that USAF could build a less-formidable type for theater war purposes, while continuing to construct huge and expensive ones for long-lasting strategic purposes. As for space acquisition authorities—which the Pentagon took away from USAF—the General noted, "We certainly believe [that those authorities] should migrate back to the Air Force," and that he will continue to press for it.

 

"Theology." General Schwartz made it clear that he sees no point in interservice quarrels about which branch will, or will not, have control of certain systems or missions. In recent years, USAF resisted Army moves to acquire and operate small airlifters and medium-to-high-altitude UAVs. General Schwartz said he was "not threatened" by the Army’s actions, so long as they contribute to the welfare of the joint force. "This is a versatility issue, not an ownership issue," said he. "We have to get off of these theological debates."

 

These and similar future statements will at some point begin to change the public’s view of the Air Force, and even the service’s self-image.

 

The remarks are not comprehensive. Even so, however, the Chief’s words, taken together, go some way toward fulfilling the classic definition of doctrine—a clear statement of an organization’s fundamental principles and purposes.

 

There are some shaky spots in General Schwartz’s plan. As he acknowledges, his reduction in the proposed F-22 force will bring more risk. And that’s assuming the Pentagon goes along with buying any more Raptors, which is no sure thing.

 

The Chief offers no obvious solution to the dangers of operating an ancient and weakening fleet of aircraft—bombers, fighters, tankers, airlifters, airborne battle management types, and helicopters.

 

What if the other services’ embrace of larger and larger air fleets gets out of hand? That could lead to inefficiencies and confusion with respect to the control of aircraft in combat operations.

 

General Schwartz freely acknowledges that his effort to change the service will bring some pain, and that many fail to see the need for such a shift. He rejects this as a reason for inaction.

 

"In the real world," he maintains, "truth changes because circumstances and assumptions and so on change. I don’t think it’s a signal of weakness. ... On the contrary, I think it’s a sign of a healthy institution that we’re willing to revisit long-held beliefs, no matter how central to our ethos they may be."

 

 

http://www.airforce-magazine.com/MagazineA...9/0409edit.aspx

Edited by intruder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest intruder

Visto che non c'è un topic ufficiale per l'F15, piazzo qui per non far confusione col Silent Eagle:

 

 

USAF F-15s May Get Service Life Extension

 

May 26, 2009

 

 

 

By Amy Butler aviationweek.com

 

 

F15E-USAF.jpg

 

 

 

 

The U.S. Air Force is conducting fatigue tests on F-15C/D/Es to assess whether the aircraft are suitable for a service life extension program (SLEP).

 

The fleet is expected to be good for about 8,000 flying hours, and Lt. Gen. Mark Shackelford, military deputy for the Air Force acquisition czar, says a SLEP could take them to 12,000 flying hours. The service is also exploring a SLEP for the F-16, which would take the aircraft from 4,000 flying hours to 8,000 flying hours.

 

Extending the lives of the legacy, fourth-generation fleet is a potentially attractive option as the Air Force faces a shortfall during the transition from F-16s and F-15s to new F-22s and F-35s.

 

This issue is near and dear to some lawmakers — including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz) — who worry their Air National Guard units now operating F-16s or F-15s slated for retirement will dissipate without new fighters. There is a gap expected until the F-35 comes online. The Air Force is accelerating retirement of 250 fighters in fiscal 2010.

 

Giffords and other lawmakers grilled three Air Force generals May 20 during a House Armed Services airland subcommittee hearing about the transition plan from legacy to future fighters for the Guard. The officers said a plan is expected in November, after the Quadrennial Defense Review.

 

So far, the plans calls for two of 18 Air National Guard air sovereignty mission units will get F-22s, four will receive upgraded “Golden Eagles” and the remaining 12 are to be determined. Some are likely to get unmanned aerial vehicle missions, though some may lack new flying missions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Visto che non c'è un topic ufficiale per l'F15, piazzo qui per non far confusione col Silent Eagle:

USAF F-15s May Get Service Life Extension

 

May 26, 2009

 

By Amy Butler aviationweek.com

F15E-USAF.jpg

The U.S. Air Force is conducting fatigue tests on F-15C/D/Es to assess whether the aircraft are suitable for a service life extension program (SLEP).

 

The fleet is expected to be good for about 8,000 flying hours, and Lt. Gen. Mark Shackelford, military deputy for the Air Force acquisition czar, says a SLEP could take them to 12,000 flying hours. The service is also exploring a SLEP for the F-16, which would take the aircraft from 4,000 flying hours to 8,000 flying hours.

 

Extending the lives of the legacy, fourth-generation fleet is a potentially attractive option as the Air Force faces a shortfall during the transition from F-16s and F-15s to new F-22s and F-35s.

 

This issue is near and dear to some lawmakers — including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz) — who worry their Air National Guard units now operating F-16s or F-15s slated for retirement will dissipate without new fighters. There is a gap expected until the F-35 comes online. The Air Force is accelerating retirement of 250 fighters in fiscal 2010.

 

Giffords and other lawmakers grilled three Air Force generals May 20 during a House Armed Services airland subcommittee hearing about the transition plan from legacy to future fighters for the Guard. The officers said a plan is expected in November, after the Quadrennial Defense Review.

 

So far, the plans calls for two of 18 Air National Guard air sovereignty mission units will get F-22s, four will receive upgraded “Golden Eagles” and the remaining 12 are to be determined. Some are likely to get unmanned aerial vehicle missions, though some may lack new flying missions.

 

secondo me iniziano ad estendere un pò troppo la vita di alcuni velivoli, non vorrei che fra qualche anno si trovassero gli aerei con seri problemi strutturali. comunque penso che sia giusto aspettare l'entrata in servizio del F35

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
secondo me iniziano ad estendere un pò troppo la vita di alcuni velivoli, non vorrei che fra qualche anno si trovassero gli aerei con seri problemi strutturali. comunque penso che sia giusto aspettare l'entrata in servizio del F35

 

con la produzione dell'f-22 bloccato a 183 unità che altro possono fare? comprarsi il typhoon :asd: ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
con la produzione dell'f-22 bloccato a 183 unità che altro possono fare? comprarsi il typhoon :asd: ?

 

si quoto, è quella la causa

Edited by butthead

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bhè se l'america comprasse il typhoon vuol dire che l'F-35 non sta andando bene

p.s. ma sono solo io che non vedo i messaggi tutti uno sott l'altro ma in schema sotto il post iniziale??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
con la produzione dell'f-22 bloccato a 183 unità che altro possono fare? comprarsi il typhoon :asd: ?

 

 

Comprare ancora più F-35, esattamente quello che faranno.

Quanto agli F-15 il prolungamento della vita operativa è qualcosa di normalissimo, la stessa cosa che faremo noi con i nostri Tornado.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Caschi male....

 

Pensa te su questo forum sono convinti che l'F-35 sia addirittura... un caccia :rotfl:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:asd: scusa ma JSF non vuol dire Joint Strike Fighter???

anche se può fare azioni di bombardamento tattico è pur sempre un caccia...penso...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pensa te su questo forum sono convinti che l'F-35 sia addirittura... un caccia rotfl2.gif

bhe su questo forum non si fanno collezioni di figurine o ci si inchina ai dictat di ebonsi ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ma dai che scherzavo... Ovvio che è anche un caccia :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Estenderanno la vita degli F15s fino all'arrivo degli F35..per poi gradualmente ritirarli..

 

Visto i pochi soldi..e la chiusura delle linee F22 discorso più che logico e coerente :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Uno dei problemi prioritari per l'USAF (ma in generale per le forze aeree americane) è ringiovanire la flotta.

Quando si hanno in servizio migliaia di velivoli ciò può diventare una sfida la cui soluzione è tutt'altro che semplice, specialmente in periodo di tagli al bilancio e crisi economica globale.

Come abbiamo avuto modo di discutere in altre sedi l'USAF ed i rispettivi comandi (Air Combat Command, Air Mobility Command, Air National Guard, etc) hanno deciso di prolungare il servizio di diversi aerei deputati a compiti vitali (attacco, bombardamento, trasporto, rifornimento, etc), vuoi per motivi tecnici, vuoi per ragioni d'opportunità, vuoi per questioni economiche.

Il problema è che nel tempo aver privilegiato determinate scelte piuttosto che altre ha portato l'età media della flotta americana a livelli altissimi. In questo grafici sono rappresentate le età medie delle flotte nei vari ambiti operativi (caccia-bombardieri, bombardieri, rifornimento e trasporto). E' evidente che per alcuni di essi la situazione graficamente descritta è problematica (se non drammatica), con conseguenze limite tipo il B-52 o i KC-135 in servizio fino al 2030!!! Infatti sono specialmente la flotta Tanker e la flotta Bombardieri a soffrire più dell'onsolescenza....anche se ovviamente pure la flotta caccia-attacco non scherza (ma in questo caso è evidente che con la prossima e certa introduzione dell'F-35 le cose miglioreranno rapidamente).

 

PUB_USA_Aging_Aircraft_Graph_lg.gif

Edited by paperinik

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Impressionante il grafico dei tankers...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest intruder

USAF Cancels TSAT Ground Segment Work

 

Jun 9, 2009

 

 

Amy Butler abutler@aviationweek.com

 

 

 

The U.S. Air Force isn't waiting for congressional approval to proceed with dismantling the multi-billion dollar Transformational Satellite architecture that was proposed for termination by Defense Secretary Robert Gates last month.

 

The service announced June 8 it was terminating for convenience the Transformational Satellite Communications System Mission Operations System (TMOS) contract with Lockheed Martin.

 

TMOS was to be the ground support infrastructure for the new jam-proof satellite communications architecture. The contract was worth over $2 billion. No doubt Lockheed and the Air Force will be negotiating an amicable parting of ways; a total cost for the termination isn't yet known.

 

The service also announced termination of a contract for engineering support and integration with Booz Allen Hamilton worth about $20.8 million.

 

Meanwhile, the Air Force plans to allow the competitive risk reduction contracts with Lockheed Martin and Boeing for the satellite segment to run out, which will occur July 7. To date, the Pentagon has spent about $733 million with each company for this work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ma invece di spendere tutti quei soldi con l' F-35 che insomma proprio un caccia non è perchè non puntare sul typhoon che è un vero multiruolo. per quanto riguarda gli F-15 penso che frà un po risusciteranno anche l' F-4 :rotfl: :rotfl:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Per 3 semplici motivi:

 

-Sono americani e non acquisteranno un caccia europeo (orgoglio patriottico portato all'estremo :rotfl: )

 

-Il software dell'F-35 è sicuramente molto meglio integrato allo stato attuale rispetto a quello del Typhoon (il nostro EFA, per quanto abbia grandissime potenzialità, ha ancora tanta strada davanti a sè, e gli americani, soprattutto grazie al know-how che hanno in campo aeronautico, preferiscono sviluppare le cose in proprio e farle per bene) e anche se non può svolgere bene il ruolo della caccia, è più multiruolo (anche se indirizzato prevalentemente all'A-G) di quanto non lo sia il nostro campioncino

 

-Hanno ripreso la prima linea divisa in componenti high e low (come prima era per F-15 ed F-16) ed è una struttura che funziona assai bene (l'F-22 svolge in misura maggiore la parte del caccia e l'F-35 il ruolo di attacco), con compiti ben equilibrati

 

 

P.S. Non offendermi l'Eagle!!! :furioso:

 

No dai scherzo :rolleyes: , tieni conto che comunque con la MSIP che continua ad andare avanti, gli F-15 più aggiornati hanno un software incredibile, per il momento molto superiore a quello dell'EFA (che mi piace comunque da matti)

 

Se ho detto qualche cavolata segnalatemelo

Edited by sidewinder89

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

io non sono di questa idea perchè si sono d'accordo con il fatto che sono molti patriottici (non scordiamoci che hanno comprato il C-27 cmq) ma sul fatto che gli F-15 aggiornati siano meglio dell typhoon........... :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ma non trovate un pò privo di senso (ergo stupido) stare a dire questo è meglio di quello, piuttosto che di quell'altro?!

Specialmente quando gli aerei che si raffrontano sono tutti appartenenti alla c.d. 4ta generazione (per quanto i responsabili delle relazioni pubbliche delle varie industrie si sforzino a definire il loro prodotto di generazione 4,5, 4 e 1/2, 4+ o 5--).

 

Un aereo militare non si valuta in termini assoluti, ma si valuta in funzione di decine di altri elementi che ne caratterizzano l'uso:

l'impiego principale per cui esso nasce, la capacità di impieghi secondari, l'affinamento delle tecniche di volo sviluppato negli anni dai piloti, l'addestramento stesso dei piloti, l'utilizzo di altre piattaforme definite "moltiplicatori" (quali sono ad esempio gli Awacs, i Tanker, i velivoli Sigint ed Elint, etc) ed altri ancora.

 

Gli americani non scelgono i loro aerei per partito preso o per mero patriottismo (che in definitiva non è altro che un modo alternativo per riferirsi al fenomeno economico del protezionismo), ma perchè determinate macchine sono state pensate e prodotte specificamente per la loro forza aerea.

L'industria aeronautica militare americana ha in mente in primo luogo gli Stati Uniti stessi, solo dopo vengono i clienti esteri.

 

Forse l'F-15E non è superiore ad un Typhoon nei compiti air-to-air (e probabilmente occorrerebbe dire: "e ci mancherebbe altro!", visto che nascono l'uno decenni dopo dell'altro e per compiti totalmente diversi), ma se rapportiamo l'F-15E al contesto reale in cui esso è destinato ad operare vedrete che senza dubbio è una scelta infinitamente migliore rispetto ad un qualsiasi altro aereo export.

 

Vi invito quindi a non fare valutazioni semplicistiche, ma a riflettere sul significato globale di "forza aerea".

Edited by paperinik

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
io non sono di questa idea perchè si sono d'accordo con il fatto che sono molti patriottici (non scordiamoci che hanno comprato il C-27 cmq) ma sul fatto che gli F-15 aggiornati siano meglio dell typhoon........... :rolleyes:

Secondo me è anche vero visto che,come già detto in altri topic, il Typhoon si sta ancora "siluppando" mentre l' F15 ha parecchi anni di vita e quindi ha un livello di sviluppo che in alcuni ambiti può essere più avanzato di quello dell' Eurofighter, uno sviluppo che,sicuramente,tra qualche anno, il caccia euroopeo sarà in grado di eguagliare e superare.

 

EDIT: Paperinik mi ha anticipato...scusate...

Edited by foxhound 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Faber

 

Mi hai frainteso...il mio non è un giudizio in termini assoluti...sto solo diceno che a livello avionico l'F-15C più aggiornato è ATTUALMENTE ad un livello superiore al Typhoon (e sarà così finchè il software dell'EFA non sarà completamente a punto, cosa per cui potrebbero volerci ancora diversi anni)...ciò che dico, quindi, non è che l'Eagle sia complessivamente migliore del nostro delta-canard (in dogfight, con piloti di pari capacità, sarebbe probabilmente spacciato) e non è nemmeno ciò che mi interessa affermare...l'unica cosa che voglio dire è che i suoi apparati si collocano per il momento ad un livello superiore (ciò è dovuto all'elevato sviluppo dell'industria aeronautica americana, sviluppo che si è creato sulle solide basi di un'ampia esperienza bellica e anche di batoste passate) e non vedo cosa ci sia di male a retrofittare tali apparati su aerei più anziani che però hanno sempre svolto il loro compito in maniera eccellente, anche in difficili teatri operativi, maturando una grande esperienza...l'EFA è un aereo meraviglioso, ma, come già detto anche in altri topic, troppo immaturo per poterne dare un giudizio definitivo e complessivo (e se la sogna, per il momento, l'esperienza e l'efficacia dimostrata in combattimento dai Falcon e degli Eagle americani e israeliani)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest intruder
ma invece di spendere tutti quei soldi con l' F-35 che insomma proprio un caccia non è perchè non puntare sul typhoon che è un vero multiruolo.

 

Non è imbarcabile e non VTOL, se ti riferisci agli americani.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

si giusto è vero non è VTOL ma mi riferivo all' USAF grazie. cmq paperinik ha ragione perchè effettivamente non c'entra niente il patriottismo ma più che altro l'esigenza del paese stesso che produce aerei per le esigenze dell' USAF e non gli frega niente degli altri paesi. per quanto riguarda l'F-15 ho capito grazie :adorazione:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest intruder

NorthCom/NORAD Seeks Multirole Aircraft

 

The U.S. Air Force general in charge of U.S. Northern Command (NorthCom) says he needs multi-role aircraft to perform his varied missions, meaning the newest U.S. fighter is not necessarily the answer.

 

Those missions include maritime surveillance and air patrol and interdiction, Gen. Victor Renuart told Aviation Week after a speech last week on Capitol Hill. “Part of this air sovereignty mission is identification and non-kinetic enforcement. It’s diverting airplanes away. It’s identifying unknowns in our system. That doesn’t always require an F-22,” he said.

 

“I continue to advocate with Congress, and with the Air Force in particular, that you need to maintain a baseline capability of air defense-capable fighters that have an ability, also, to detect threats in the maritime,” Renuart said, “so it’s air-to-air and air-to-surface sensor capability that I need.”

 

Renuart, who further heads U.S.-Canadian North American Aerospace Defense Command, says he has sufficient fighters “right now” to fly air sovereignty and defense missions. But “there is a fighter gap developing” there as older Boeing F-15s and Lockheed Martin F-16s -- flown mostly by the Air National Guard – age and retire. Renuart and National Guard leaders have been sounding related concerns all year (Aerospace DAILY, March 28).

 

The number of fighters available for the air sovereignty alert (ASA) mission is expected to sink below 2,000 aircraft because 250 fighters are slated for retirement in the Fiscal 2010 budget (DAILY, June 2). The Guard operates 16 of the 18 ASA sites. Eleven units on alert status fly F-16s and of those, eight are expected to reach the end of their service life between 2015 and 2017.

 

The congressional Government Accountability Office reported in January that if Guard aircraft are not replaced by 2020, 11 of the ASA sites theoretically could be without tactical aircraft.

 

But in his Hill speech hosted by the National Defense University Foundation, Renuart noted that he is not specifically seeking ASA fighters. “I’m careful not to ask for dedicated fighters that can only do my mission, because if you say they only do air defense, then they become less relevant for the many other missions we have.”

 

He said the real sticking point will come “from here to 2013 as we begin to see higher-rate production of the F-35 coming along -- and that will require just careful management.”

 

Those concerns are shared by National Guard officials and some in Congress. Language added to the Fiscal 2010 defense authorization bill passed by the House Armed Service s Committee last week would require the Pentagon to study and submit a report on an interim buy of upgraded F-15s, F-16s and F-18 to close the so-called “fighter gap” predicted by many observers between 2015 and 2025.

 

The measure, sponsored by Rep. Frank Lo Biondo (R-N.J.), calls for the Pentagon to study whether Congress should authorize a multiyear procurement contract for so-called 4.5 generation fighter aircraft – those equipped with advanced weapons, avionics and active electronically scanned array radar (AESA).

 

www.aviatonweek.om

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest iscandar

Sembrerebbe dall'articole che il norad cerca un multiruolo che non sia l'F-22 e neanche l'F-35, ma un aereo "normale" capace di sorvegianza marittima, pattugliamento ed interdizione...

Edited by iscandar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×