Jump to content

Ultime dall'India


eagle spotters
 Share

Recommended Posts

Fonte: India today

 

Italians are coming

Sandeep Unnithan

June 5, 2008

 

Last year, when Paolo Girasole, a senior executive with Italian arms major Finmeccanica, was given the option of a foreign posting, he instantly picked India.

The slow-moving decision-making process would need getting used to but the world's second-largest defence market marked an exciting business opportunity.

Reason enough for Italian arms major Finmeccanica to pack its coffee, olive oil and pasta and head for New Delhi.

From one-off suppliers of torpedoes, radars and naval guns to India, Italy is the arriviste in the Indian defence market, quietly becoming one of India's largest potential military equipment suppliers.

Earlier this year, the Indian Navy signed a ¤200 million (Rs 1,300 crore) contract with Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri for a new fleet tanker.

The tanker to be built in Italy and delivered by 2010 will greatly increase the naval fleet's endurance at sea.

Finmeccanica's helicopter division, Augusta Westland, is the frontrunner in a multi-million contract to supply 12 AW-101 VVIP helicopters worth around Rs 110 crore each for use by the President and prime minister.

Four of these are for the use by the Special Protection Group. In a replay of the Marine One contest for the US presidential helicopter last year, field evaluations conducted by the Indian Air Force (IAF), the triple-engined Italian helicopter trumped its only competitor, the US Sikorsky S-92.

The contract to be signed later this year for the flying offices equipped with advanced communication aids and self-protection devices could well be the greatest Italian export to India since the iconic Vespa scooter in the 1960s.

The Italian story rides mostly on the 'two Fins'-state-owned Finmeccanica which supplies electronics, radars, artillery and aircraft, and Fincantieri that makes ships.

Co-located in a single building in downtown Delhi's Nehru Place and co-incidentally headed by two engineers who attended the Italian naval academy together, the firms with turnovers of ¤12.5 and ¤2.5 billion (Rs 81,250 crore and Rs 16,250 crore) respectively are frontrunners in practically every significant defence contract.

"India is the number one export priority for us," says Massimo de Benedictis, country representative, Fincantieri.

For good reason. Current European Union (EU) arms embargoes against China make India, with $45 billion (Rs 1.89 lakh crore) earmarked for defence acquisitions over the next five years, an attractive alternative.

Fincantieri's FREMM stealth frigate is a contender for a seven-warship order worth Rs 30,000 crore. The shipbuilder is also vying to sell six advanced offshore patrol vessels to the navy and coast guard.

If the 38,000-tonne Indigenous Aircraft Carrier being built at the Cochin Shipyard Limited looks like a bigger version of Italy's new carrier, the Cavour, it is because it was designed with assistance from Fincantieri which is also integrating the ship's propulsion system.

Italy has emerged as an attractive shipbuilding destination due to rapid delivery schedules, high technology and competitive costs.

While accepting a new oceanographic survey vessel from Fincantieri in December 2007, Science and Technology Minister Kapil Sibal joked how it had taken his ministry three years to get the financing for a ship which took the yard just 18 months to build.

The navy will get its new Italian tanker in just two years, while it took Garden Reach Shipyard 12 years to build the navy's last tanker- the INS Aditya.

The induction of the AW-101 will give Italy a toe-hold into the burgeoning defence aerospace market.

Augusta Westland's NH-90 is a frontrunner to supply 16 Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) choppers for the navy, 324 light utility choppers for the air force and army, 13 ATR turbo-prop maritime patrol aircraft to the navy and coast guard and two C-27J Spartan medium transport aircraft for the Border Security Force.

The company owns 40 per cent of Eurofighter which is a contender in the $10 billion (Rs 40,000 crore) contract to supply 126 fighter aircraft to the air force.

The entry of the Italians is not incidental. Ever since the nations decided to enhance bilateral cooperation in defence production in 2002 and inked a memorandum of understanding on defence industrial cooperation the following year, defence ties have been on a steady trot.

The joint working group on defence, headed by the defence secretaries, held its seventh meeting last March.

One reason for the Italian connection is the recent policy of diversifying India's arms suppliers.

Over 70 per cent of the Indian military machine is of Soviet and Russian origin with the navy almost entirely dependent on Russian weaponry for its warships, submarines and aircraft.

A troublesome relationship, particularly over the acquisition of spares has left the armed forces keen on alternate sources.

"Overall it is best to diversify the supplier base and enter into technological collaboration with the best in different fields because we always face the risk of resumption of sanctions," says Brigadier Gurmeet Kanwal, director, Centre for Land Warfare Studies.

India's Defence Procurement Procedure, floated in 2005, calls for open tenders for procuring all major arms systems, transfer of technology and offsets of 30 per cent (suppliers have to procure 30 per cent of the value of their contracts from Indian industry).

"While Italy has expertise in the production of high-tech weapon systems, India brings in the great asset of manpower," says a defence official.

This allows Italian majors to acquire stakes in private and public sector Indian defence industry and even setting up shop.

This hasn't happened because the cap of 26 per cent Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) is not attractive enough for the Italian majors.

The Government says it is only a matter of time before FDI is hiked to 49 per cent. And when that happens, the Italians would have truly arrived.

 

In evidenza le seguenti considerazioni:

 

Italy on the go

- With an EU-imposed arms embargo against China, India is the largest potential arms market.

- The Italians are front-runners in a number of aerospace and naval programmes.

- Rapid delivery schedules, high technology and competitive costs make them attractive for tie-ups.

 

VERY INTERSTING !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I soldi indiani fanno gola a molti e il "buy russian" che hanno portato avanti per molti anni è in declino.

L'affair Gorshow/Vikramatya sta creando una grossa frattura tra l'India e il Rososenborg che si occupa di tutto l'export dei Russi.

 

Per l'affare MMRCA, il contratto più imponente da oltre 10 miliardi di $, noi italiani siamo completamente tagliati, anche in caso di scelta multipla come clausola prevista, fuori perchè l'F-2000 non ha speranze, gli USA hanno offerto F-16IN e F/A-18IN (super hornet indiano) e per quest'ultimo hanno offerto la Kitty Hawk gratis, ma hanno ovviamente negato, se viene preso in almeno 65 pezzi

 

L'AW-101 VIP per la Indian Air Force (IAF) è l'aereo da acquistare al 100% e del chopper usa non sanno che farsene. Hanno detto che solo motivi politici potranno far cambiare la scelta che tecnicamente è 100% per l'AW

 

Dell'NH-90, C-27J e ATR-72 ASW mi giungono nuovi come offerte ma non mi sorprende, specie per gli ultimi 2.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Se non sbaglio il discorso della Gorschow dovrebbe risolversi finalmente entro quest'anno o, alla peggio, entro il prossimo...

 

Scusa, il discorso della Kitty Hawk mi sorprende non poco, puoi citarmi delle fonti ufficiali?

 

Non è un discorso da poco quello che dici, perchè se davvero l'India finisse a breve con lo schierare Vikramaditya, Vikrant II e Kitty Hawk ci sarebbero delle implicazioni non da poco da quelle parti: la Cina non starebbe certo a guardare e di conseguenza si agiterebbero giappone e Corea del Sud...

 

Ho comunque delle perplessità su quel che dici: non credo che la marina Indiana, nonostante abbia confidenza con le portaerei (la vecchia Vikrant era anche CTOL prima di esser convertita) sia in grado di fare in breve un salto così grosso, inoltre non mi pare che la loro flotta sia in grado di fornire scorta a 3 PA in breve tempo:

 

Ora la Viraat è protetta dai 3 Delhi che poi, credo passeranno alla Vikramaditya, la Vikrant II dovrebbe esser protetta dai nascenti Kolkota più ci sono le fregate e gli SSN (però ancora in cantiere), ma per poter proteggere una terza PA bisognerebbe attendere la seconda generazione di DDG Kolkata che non credo si vedranno prima del 2017...

Edited by SU-27
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Se non sbaglio il discorso della Gorschow dovrebbe risolversi finalmente entro quest'anno o, alla peggio, entro il prossimo...

 

Scusa, il discorso della Kitty Hawk mi sorprende non poco, puoi citarmi delle fonti ufficiali?

 

Non è un discorso da poco quello che dici, perchè se davvero l'India finisse a breve con lo schierare Vikramaditya, Vikrant II e Kitty Hawk ci sarebbero delle implicazioni non da poco da quelle parti: la Cina non starebbe certo a guardare e di conseguenza si agiterebbero giappone e Corea del Sud...

 

Ho comunque delle perplessità su quel che dici: non credo che la marina Indiana, nonostante abbia confidenza con le portaerei (la vecchia Vikrant era anche CTOL prima di esser convertita) sia in grado di fare in breve un salto così grosso, inoltre non mi pare che la loro flotta sia in grado di fornire scorta a 3 PA in breve tempo:

 

Ora la Viraat è protetta dai 3 Delhi che poi, credo passeranno alla Vikramaditya, la Vikrant II dovrebbe esser protetta dai nascenti Kolkota più ci sono le fregate e gli SSN (però ancora in cantiere), ma per poter proteggere una terza PA bisognerebbe attendere la seconda generazione di DDG Kolkata che non credo si vedranno prima del 2017...

 

 

Già così la Cina non rimarrà molto alla finestra.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

L'offerta riguardante l'ex Kitty Hawk, secondo il mio autorevole parere, è una via di mezzo tra una leggenda metropolitana ed una (stupida) trovata di marketing. Oppure una sciocchezza pura e semplice. Comunque sembra che l'incendio subito dall'USS G. Washington abbia rimandato il pensionamento dell'ultima CV-senza-N almeno da un punto di vista formale. Staremo a vedere...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

L 'India a mio avviso non avrebbe ne le possibilita' economiche ne la conoscenza per gestire 3 portaerei di differente tipologia poi.

 

 

No infatti, non credo che al momento potrebbe permettersele, ma nel giro di una 20 di anni credo che il discorso sia più che fattibile vista la velocità con cui sta crescendo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

L 'India a mio avviso non avrebbe ne le possibilita' economiche ne la conoscenza per gestire 3 portaerei di differente tipologia poi.

 

 

 

Bè la Viraat "dovrebbe" uscire di scena nel 2012, mentre la Vikrant e la Vikramaditya dovrebbero entrare in scena quell'anno. Per cui volonti o nolenti avranno per un breve periodo 3 PA attive, e di sicuro 2 poi. Pari alle nostre. <_<

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bè la Viraat "dovrebbe" uscire di scena nel 2012, mentre la Vikrant e la Vikramaditya dovrebbero entrare in scena quell'anno. Per cui volonti o nolenti avranno per un breve periodo 3 PA attive, e di sicuro 2 poi. Pari alle nostre. <_<

 

Per la verità, gli indiani prevederebbero di costruire una sorella della nuova Vikrant: la decisione definitiva sarà presa nel 2010, anno che prevede il varo della Vikrant. Questa terza unità dovrebbe entrare in servizio nel 2017 e potrebbe esser più grande della Vikrant.

 

Ciò significa che l'India potrebbe disporre di 3PA a partire dal 2018, a quanto ne so dovrebbero tenerne in operatività 2 mentre la terza è in manutenzione. La data, già prossima è la più ragionevole anche tenendo conto che le uniche unità adatte per scortare PA sono i 3 DDG Delhi e che il primo dei nuovissimi Kolkota entrerà in servizio solo nel 2010 mentre per scortare 3 PA ci vorrà la seconda serie di Kolkota che è ancora sulla carta. Oltre a questo bisogna tener presente che anche le FFG Shivalik sono ancora in cantiere così come i nuovi SSGN di cui non ne è ancora operativo nessuno...

 

Stanno già correndo troppo, secondo me, è assurdo pretendere che digeriscano in 2 anni 3 PA nuove

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Per la verità, gli indiani prevederebbero di costruire una sorella della nuova Vikrant: la decisione definitiva sarà presa nel 2010, anno che prevede il varo della Vikrant. Questa terza unità dovrebbe entrare in servizio nel 2017 e potrebbe esser più grande della Vikrant.

 

Ciò significa che l'India potrebbe disporre di 3PA a partire dal 2018, a quanto ne so dovrebbero tenerne in operatività 2 mentre la terza è in manutenzione. La data, già prossima è la più ragionevole anche tenendo conto che le uniche unità adatte per scortare PA sono i 3 DDG Delhi e che il primo dei nuovissimi Kolkota entrerà in servizio solo nel 2010 mentre per scortare 3 PA ci vorrà la seconda serie di Kolkota che è ancora sulla carta. Oltre a questo bisogna tener presente che anche le FFG Shivalik sono ancora in cantiere così come i nuovi SSGN di cui non ne è ancora operativo nessuno...

 

Stanno già correndo troppo, secondo me, è assurdo pretendere che digeriscano in 2 anni 3 PA nuove

 

 

Prevedo un repentino aumento di mezzi anche da parte della Cina che non credo affatto ci tenga a farsi superare dall'india essendo una diretta concorrente, inoltre anche il pakistan non starà a guardare

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Prevedo un repentino aumento di mezzi anche da parte della Cina che non credo affatto ci tenga a farsi superare dall'india essendo una diretta concorrente, inoltre anche il pakistan non starà a guardare

 

 

Sarà, ma il Pakistan non mi sembra all'altezza dell'India. Forse con qualche aiuto USA, ma............. :hmm:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Spero x gli indiani sia molto più vecchia!

Non ho trovato altro, non è che per caso hai foto recenti?

 

 

è difficile trovare foto su queste navi dall'india, in india non funziona come in italia che vengono fatti gli album fotografici alle nostre navi.

 

Li se si riesce a scattare qualche foto durante tutto l'arco della costruzione è già molto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sì? Sarà ma qui in Italia le navi militari si vedono davvero pochino, anche se qualcosa sta cambiando, e soprattutto la Vikramaditya attualmente si trova in RUSSIA.

 

Non è importante che si trovi in russia, a parte l'europa e l'america, trovare foto di navi da guerra di altre nazioni PA in particolare, è molto difficile.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

è difficile trovare foto su queste navi dall'india, in india non funziona come in italia che vengono fatti gli album fotografici alle nostre navi.

 

Li se si riesce a scattare qualche foto durante tutto l'arco della costruzione è già molto

 

Difficile, non impossibile, se pensiamo che la Cina non è certo una nazione che ama metter in mostra i cantieri, su sinodefence abbiamo avuto foto regolari dalla costruzione al varo delle loro ultime unità:

 

quando arrivarono le prime foto delle fregate 054 in cantiere, noi già cercavamo di capire il numero dei VLS e la capacità ASW studiando lo scafo ancora all'asciutto.

l'lpd 071 la conoscemmo che era ancora un ammasso di lamiere, tanto che, mancando le sovrastrutture, cercavamo di capire se si voleva costruire un lpd o un lhd chinaflag.gif

 

071nov11fn9.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...