Jump to content

F16E/F Desert Falcon - discussione ufficiale


Guest intruder
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest intruder

Non ho mai imparato a usare la funzione ricerca del forum, e oggi, oltre tutto, tende a bloccarsi tutto quando clicco qui o là (problema del quale si è già parlato nella segnalazione errori), quindi non so se si è già parlato di questo argomento o meno. Se è il caso, si può unire la discussione a quella già esistente, chiedo solo venia se per qiualche giorno non mi farò vedere, ma ho anche un lavoro e sarò impegnato fuori Roma per qualche tempo. Buona discussione, se credete di portarla avanti.

 

 

 

Vi posto l'inizio di un interessante articolo, ecco il link, http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/the-ua...4538/#more-4538 riguardante l'F16E/F Desert Falcon, che viene ormai proposto, dalla stessa LM, come una sorta di F35 dei poveri.

 

Che ne pensate?

 

 

The F-16 has become what its designers intended it to be: a worthy successor to the legendary P-51 Mustang whose principles of visibility, agility, and pilot-friendliness informed its design. It is no exaggeration to call it the defining fighter of its age, the plane that many people around the world think of when they think “fighter.” The aircraft’s ability to handle future adversaries like the thrust-vectoring MiG-29OVT/35 and advanced surface-air missile systems is in question, but upgrades have kept F-16s popular. The planes have been produced in several countries around the world, thanks to licensing agreements, but this does not change their status as the American defense industry’s greatest success story of the last 40 years.

 

AIR_F-16F_Block_60_UAE_lg.jpg

 

 

The most advanced F-16s in the world, however, are not American. That distinction belongs to the United Arab Emirates, whose F-16 E/F Block 60s are a generation ahead of the F-16 C/D Block 50/52+ aircraft that form the backbone of the US Air Force and many other fleets around the world. The Block 60 has been described as a lower-budget alternative to the forthcoming F-35A Joint Strike Fighter – and is being treated as such in countries like India and the Netherlands, as they contemplate their future fighter needs.

 

The UAE invested in the type’s development, and with that investment comes inevitable fielding, training, and equipping needs. This DID article showcases the F-16 E/F “Desert Falcon,” and offers a window into its associated costs. The latest item is a contract for AMRAAM missiles, which had been part of an earlier DSCA request…

 

The F-16 has now undergone 6 major block changes since its inception in the late 1970s, incorporating 4 generations of core avionics, 5 engine versions divided between 2 basic models (P&W F100 and GE F110), 5 radar versions, 5 electronic warfare suites, and 2 generations of most other subsystems. Moore’s Law applies as well, albeit more slowly: the latest F-16’s core computer suite has over 2,000 times the memory and over 260 times the throughput of the original production F-16.

 

Even so, each advance costs money to develop, integrate, and test. The UAE invested almost $3 billion of its money into research and development for the Desert Falcon. The aircraft’s conformal fuel tanks look a lot like the current Block 50/52 versions at first glance, but carry more fuel and allow a 40% range increase to give the planes a mission radius of 1,025 miles. They will feed GE’s new F110-GE-132 engine, which produces up to 32,500 lbs. of thrust to offset the plane’s increased weight. The engine is a derivative of the proven F110-GE-129, a 29,000-pound thrust class engine that powers the majority of F-16C fighters worldwide.

 

The Desert Falcons’ most significant changes, however, are electronic. The most important is the Northrtop Grumman AN/APG-80 AESA radar, which made the UAE the first air force in the world besides the USAF to field this revolutionary new radar technology. AESA radars have more power, better range, less sidelobe “leakage,” better reliability and much better combat availability, and more potential capabilities via software improvements, vs. mechanically-scanned arrays like the AN/APG-68v9s that equip the most advanced American and foreign F-16s. Unlike the APG-68s, the APG-80 can perform simultaneous ground and air scan, track, and targeting, and has an “agile beam” that reduces the odds of detection by opposing aircraft when the radar is on. This last feature is important – one pilot has described turning on one’s radar in combat as being similar to turning on a flashlight in a large and dark building.

 

The Desert Falcons also take a step beyond the targeting pod systems fielded on other F-16s, by incorporating them into the aircraft itself. Northrop Grumman’s AN/ASQ-32 IFTS is derived from its work on the AN/AQS-28 LITENING AT pod, but the internal positioning reduces drag and radar signature, and frees up a weapons pylon. The ASQ-32 can be used to find aerial targets, as well as opponents on the ground.

 

Various advanced electronic countermeasures systems make up the Falcon Edge Integrated Electronic Warfare System (IEWS), which provides both advance warning capabilities and automatic countermeasures release.

 

A helmet mounted display option provides advanced capabilities commensurate with their most modern counterparts, and displays information from the aircraft’s radar and sensors. Avionics improvements round out the enhancements via an advanced mission computer to enhance sensor and weapon integration, a trio of 5”x7” color displays in the cockpit, et. al.

 

The first flight of the F-16E/F was made in December 2003. Flight testing by Lockheed Martin began in early 2004 and is continuing with three F-16F models. UAE pilot training on the F-16E/F began at Tucson Air National Guard Base, AZ in September 2004, and the first group of pilots completed their training in April 2005. The first Desert Falcons arrived in the UAE in May 2005, and production continues. Versions of this aircraft have also been entered in a number of international competitions, including Brazil’s F-X2 (eliminated) and India’s MMRCA competition.

 

In the course of development, 2 key issues came up with respect to the F-16 Block 60. One was the familiar issue of source code control for key avionics and electronic warfare systems. The other was weapons carriage.

 

As a rule, the software source codes that program the electronic-warfare, radar, and data buses on US fighters are too sensitive for export. Instead, the USA sent the UAE “object codes” (similar to APIs), which allow them to add to the F-16’s threat library on their own.

 

The other issue concerned the Black Shahine derivative of MBDA’s Storm Shadow stealth cruise missile. The Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) defines 300 km as the current limit for cruise missiles, and the terms of the sale allow the United States to regulate which weapons the F-16s can carry. Since the Black Shahine was deemed to have a range of over 300km, the US State Department refused to let Lockheed Martin change the data bus to permit the F-16E/Fs to carry the missile. It is believed that the Mirage 2000v9 upgrades the UAE has purchased from France will address this issue, giving the UAE a platform capable of handling their new acquisition.

 

 

 

 

L'articolo prosegue al link, qui diverrebbe troppo lungo.

Edited by intruder
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 82
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

La Lokeed Martin sta facendo una campagnia molto agguerrita, basandosi su idee innovative (F-22 ed F-35) e su progetti di successo (F-16E/F).

Mi sa molto di minestra riscaldata.

Ma come stanno facendo le dirette concorrenti (vedi Boeing con l'F/A 18) la LM propone versioni aggiornate dei caccia di precedente generazione, mettendo sul mercato un ottimo attrezzo sebbene la longevità del progetto.

 

E tutti quanti sappiamo che F16 e F18 sono sempre due cattive bestie in aria :)

Edited by F/A Fede
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Può far male ad aerei come il Gripen e al massimo agli alti prodotti europei (vedi Rafale in marocco o i rischi in Romania), o, al massimo, al SH, ma se si vuole un aereo di nuova generazione non può opporre grande resistenza, di certo è utile a LM per offrire una gamma più completa possibile.

Di certo è una macchina temibile che ha pochi rivali al mondo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Così migliorato farebbe paura anche ad un Tifone, se non considerassimo che seppure sia un eccellente aereo quest'ultima versione del Falcon è anche il suo ultimo stadio evolutivo. Sinceramente non credo sia sempre produttivo investire in una macchina che non ha neanche il potenziale di crescita per subire un MLU, anche perchè di "mid life" non si tratterebbe...

 

Vale lo stesso discorso dei rivali russi: ottima macchina, elettronica da panico, sistemi d'arma a non finire, ma rimane pur sempre un progetto con quasi 40 anni (quaranta) sul groppone.

 

Questo non per dire che sia inferiore attualmente alle ultime creature europee, ma con un po' di lungimiranza è evidente che lo sarà presto.

Edited by Tuccio14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beh, l'F-16IN proposto nel bando indiano MMRCA è in verità molto temibile come avversario.

La Lockheed Martin lo definisce l'F-16 più avanzato mai proposto, ancora più dell'F-16blk60 consegnato agli UAE.

 

Occhio quindi a bollarlo come un aereo giunto al capolinea!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder
Secondo me può far comodo a quei paesi che non si possono permettere il Typhoon o il Gripen o il Rafale per non parlare dell' f 35 e che non vogliono avere i probabili problemi logistici coi caccia russi

 

 

Quoto. E, come ha ammonito pap, attenti a considerarlo "finito". Secondo me è una macchibna che ha ancora parecchio da dire e da dare.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ricordo che quando vennero consegnati i primi esemplari di Desert Falcon molti articoli della stampa specializzata sottolinearono che per la prima volta gli americani avevano venduto ad un cliente export una versione di un velivolo complessivamente migliore e più dotata, rispetto a quella adottata per le sue forze aeree.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7.4 miliardi di dollari per 80 aerei escluso l' armamento :blink:

Ricordo che quando vennero consegnati i primi esemplari di Desert Falcon molti articoli della stampa specializzata sottolinearono che per la prima volta gli americani avevano venduto ad un cliente export una versione di un velivolo complessivamente migliore e più dotata, rispetto a quella adottata per le sue forze aeree.....

E' vero?

Edited by foxhound 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Occhio quindi a bollarlo come un aereo giunto al capolinea!

A livello elettronico no, più che altro è l'aerodinamica che dovrebbe essere ai limiti. Tra sermatoi dorsali, elettronica supplementare sul dorso non sanno più dove mettere pezzi aggiuntivi. Con il Super Hornet nonostante la forma sia simile ne hanno considerevolmente aumentato peso e volumetria

E' vero?

Decisamente sisi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder
Mamma mia 92,5 milioni a pezzo...

Quasi come un Eurofighter..anzi di più :ph34r:

 

Tieni presente che si è trattato di riprogettare estesamente la macchina, gli Emirati hanno messo 3 miliardi di dollari di tasca loro solo per lo sviluppo della macchina. In cambio, beccheranno le royalties sulle eventuali vendite a Paesi terzi, cosa che non ritengo tanto difficile se l'aereo viene offerto a un prezzo concorrenziale rispetto l'F35.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Secondo me può far comodo a quei paesi che non si possono permettere il Typhoon o il Gripen o il Rafale per non parlare dell' f 35 e che non vogliono avere i probabili problemi logistici coi caccia russi

 

 

In realtà serve più a paesi che hanno bisogno di una macchina che potenzialmente domani deve combattere una vera guerra, infatti gli Emirati hanno un vicino tumultuoso al di là dello stretto, infatti è una aereo potente e, soprattutto, combat proved, invece degli aerei europei in continua evoluzione.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

secondo me un aereo del genere ha molte possibilità di export, anche grazie, se così si può dire, alla crisi economica attuale...mi vengono in mente paesi come belgio, polonia, bulgaria, cile, pakistan ecc. che difficilmente si potranno imbarcare in progetti come F-35, typhoon o altro di 5^ generazione

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder

La situazione sudamericana potrebbe peggiorare ed essere necessario qualcosa di meglio degli F16 di seconda mano, so che la Romania sta facendo un pensierino sul Desert, si dice anche l'India, visto che ora il Pakistan è fuori gioco e probabilmente lo rimarrà a lungo, per quanto riguarda le armi americane.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tieni presente che si è trattato di riprogettare estesamente la macchina, gli Emirati hanno messo 3 miliardi di dollari di tasca loro solo per lo sviluppo della macchina. In cambio, beccheranno le royalties sulle eventuali vendite a Paesi terzi, cosa che non ritengo tanto difficile se l'aereo viene offerto a un prezzo concorrenziale rispetto l'F35.

Non penso che questo giustifichi il prezzo.

Alla fine ti acquistavano uno squadrone di Euofighter che almeno sulla carta fornisce prestazioni superiori.

Certo, non è combat proved, però sappiamo di che macchina si parla e avrebbero sicuramente speso meno soldi secondo me.

 

Il punto è:

Un F16 Desert Falcon è superiore all'EFA?

Secondo me no, e costa pure di più.

Detto questo non sarà un successone sul mercato..tutto IMHO specifico :)

Edited by F/A Fede
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Un F16 Desert Falcon è superiore all'EFA?

SI e pure NO

 

SI nel senso che è una macchina multiruolo natia e per nazioni che non possono permettersi una doppia linea e non possono aspettare l'F-35 o sono nella black-list è un'ottima scelta.

 

Nell'aria-aria ritengo che Typhoon, Raptor e Flaker sono su un altro livello rispetto a tutti gli altri.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

SI nel senso che è una macchina multiruolo natia e per nazioni che non possono permettersi una doppia linea e non possono aspettare l'F-35 o sono nella black-list è un'ottima scelta.

 

Stai dicendo che l'F16 sarebbe superiore all'Eurofighter nell'AriaTerra?

Secondo me se l'F16 eguaglia le prestazioni dell'EFA in questo settore è già tanto. :huh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stai dicendo che l'F16 sarebbe superiore all'Eurofighter nell'AriaTerra?

Secondo me se l'F16 eguaglia le prestazioni dell'EFA in questo settore è già tanto. :huh:

 

mah, tieni presente che l'avionica dell'eurofighter al momento è tutt'altro che completa.

 

non mi sento sicuro di dire che è superiore nemmeno nell'aria-aria.

 

ovviamente il potenziale offensivo dell'eurofighter è tutt'altro che sviluppato e in futuro supererà quello dell'f-16.

Edited by IamMarco
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder
mah, tieni presente che l'avionica dell'eurofighter al momento è tutt'altro che completa.

 

non mi sento sicuro di dire che è superiore nemmeno nell'aria-aria.

 

 

Quoto. Inoltre, gli Emirati hanno dovuto scegliere fra l'uovo oggi e una gallina, che potrebberivelarsi un pulcino, domani. L'Iran ce l'hanno a pochi chilometri, loro, mica a mezzo mondo di distanza come noi.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share


×
×
  • Create New...