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The Kegresse-Hinstin

 

uslt-KegresseHinstin.jpg

 

The French, like the Americans, were searching for a better and quieter track system for light tanks and both were enthused by a track and suspension system developed by Kegresse-Hinstin in the mid 1920's. The track itself was reinforced rubber and was driven by two piece drive wheels which worked on a cam action to squeeze the track more tightly when slippage occurred - assuring traction. As the adapter could not be applied to a M1917, one of the Renault FTs at Aberdeen was modified to accept the kit. It has front and rear rollers to improve trench crossing capabilities. The Kegresse-Hinstin kit did have some advantages as the French continued development until it was efficient by the late 1920s. It was then placed on numerous Citroen half tracks used in the Sahara Desert. The U.S. Ordnance Department gave up on it rather early due to problems shown in the picture on the right. Here the Renault FT tried to negotiate a turn in rough terrain and struck a tree stump resulting in part of the roadwheel assembly on the right side being ruined.

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Guest intruder

Spero sia intonso.

 

tg_01.jpgtg_02.jpg

 

The Powerful Medium Tank "TG"

 

Led by German Engineer, Edward Grote, work began on a heavily armored, medium-weight tank as an alternative to the maneuverable T-24, in 1930. Members of the Soviet Mission, after visiting Germany in late 1929/early 1930, invited Grote to the U.S.S.R. After his arrival, Grote began his work at the Design Office AVO-5, within the Aviation Engine Department of the "Bolshevik" Factory. Here, in 1930, steps were being taken to manufacture the experimental, TG Tank (Tank Grote).

 

The TG was expected to have a combat-ready weight of 20 tons, a top speed of 40 km/h, a cruising speed of 25 km/h, and 15 mm, 20 mm, 30 mm in armor. The 240 hp (176.5 kw), air-cooled, carburetor engine for the TG Tank, was specifically designed by Grote. The armament comprised of one 76 mm-cannon, one 37 mm- cannon and 4 or 5 machineguns. OGPU and NKVM were instructed to proceed with the testing and completion of the TG Tank. The assignment was given priority, as one of the most important tasks within the category of experimental tanks for 1931. The first series of 50-75 tanks were planned to familiarize the overall production process. Prior to completion, preparatory work and trials for the experimental TG Tank were also planned. Therefore, manufacture of the T-24 was continued as a temporary measure. After the completion of 80 T-24's, the production line was closed and the mass production of TG's was planned in the KhPZ. 2,000 TG Tanks were projected for manufacture in 1932.

 

S.A. Ginzgurg, head of Design Bureau #3 of the VOAO, visited Great Britain at the end of 1930. In the course of discussions with British Engineers, he learned of the new, 16-ton Tank, A-6 (Mk-III). Also in the discussions at the Vickers' Factory, he learned of the tank's layout and the technical and tactical parameters. Ginzburg presented a detailed report on the new tank upon arrival to the U.S.S.R., which caught the attention of the Red Army High Command. Moreover, the Mark III was the closest to complying with the requirements of, accepted "System of Tank-Tractor-Motorcar-Weapon-Armament of the RKKA," and was superior to the TG Tank.

 

Meantime, the "Bolshevik" Factory was working on the prototype of the TG Tank. Resolution No. 2 of the Defense Committee, from 9/2/31, set up the project management. Medved', (OGPU), was General Administrative Manager, K.K. Sirken was Head of Design Bureau, N.V. Barykov was Deputy for Manufacturing, and A. Vorobiev, (UMM) was Deputy for Design. The experimental TG Tank was completed in the summer of 1931. The tank featured three-level armament positions, elongated hull to 7.5 meters, turret located in the rear, a high box section located under the turret, a running gear with high tracks that was covered by an armored skirt, and a small observation turret with a periscope and a hydraulically assisted transmission controls.

 

tg_04.jpg

 

Meantime, the "Bolshevik" Factory was working on the prototype of the TG Tank. Resolution No. 2 of the Defense Committee, from 9/2/31, set up the project management. Medved', (OGPU), was General Administrative Manager, K.K. Sirken was Head of Design Bureau, N.V. Barykov was Deputy for Manufacturing, and A. Vorobiev, (UMM) was Deputy for Design. The experimental TG Tank was completed in the summer of 1931. The tank featured three-level armament positions, elongated hull to 7.5 meters, turret located in the rear, a high box section located under the turret, a running gear with high tracks that was covered by an armored skirt, and a small observation turret with a periscope and a hydraulically assisted transmission controls.

 

The tank was armed with a 76.2 mm-Grote-Syatchentov-Cannon, with a slit muzzle brake with a wedge type breach and thee ball-mounted Maxim-Machineguns, all set in a box section under the turret for a second level of armament. The cannon could be turned ±10° in a horizontal plane and elevated from -8° to +12° in a vertical plane. Two DT-Machineguns, in ball-mountings were fixed in side plates of the driving compartment, which constituted the first level of armament. Both guns had a limited arc of fire.

 

The third level of armament comprised of a 37 mm, PS-1 Cannon in a rotating turret located on top of the box section. The cannon could fire at ground and low flying targets at an elevation of -12° to +30°. Ammunition consisted of fifty 76.2 mm shells, eighty 37 mm shells and 7,000 rounds for the machineguns.

 

The five-man crew consisted of: a driver, commander, (also responsible for the 37 mm-cannon), machine gunner, and a gunner and loader, (76.2 mm-cannon). The driver had three vision panels with slits for field observation while driving. A periscope was mounted on top of the turret for the tank commander. On top of the driving compartment, (2) oval hatches provided access to the tank.

 

The light armor consisted of 8, 13, 16, 20 and 30 mm, rolled, steel-plates, jointed together by welding. In the rear section of the hull, a M-6 carburetor-engine, throttled to produce 250 hp, (184 kw) powered the TG. (The engine designed by Grote was not ready at the time of the trials). Transmission gears included a multi-disk, main dry-friction clutch, a six-speed gearbox with V shape teeth, and a full reverse mechanism, (2) side clutches, and (2), one-step reduction gears housed in the front wheels.

 

The suspension had individual springs (i.e., Christie Tank). The running gear was made of (2) idlers, (10) large-diameter, road wheels with 'Elastic' lining, (6) support wheels, (four of medium diameter with external shock absorbers and two of smaller diameter), and

 

Road tests took place from June 27 to October 1, 1931. The 25-ton tank had a top speed of 35 km/h on paved roads and a range of 165 km in open terrain. The transmission and traction systems, along with the steering gears proved unreliable during tests. Representatives of UMM and VOAO formed a committee to study the test results. Upon conclusion, it was agreed to designate the tank as an experimental type. Further testing of all new features was required. Despite rectifying the faults that were found during testing, it was decided that the TG Tank would not be introduced to production. Further work on the TG Tank was suspended and the services of Edward Grote were no longer required. Soon after, in August 1933, Grote was requested to leave the U.S.S.R. Despite the fact that the TG did not enter mass production, Soviet Engineers gained substantial experience in the design of medium weight tanks.

 

 

Sources:

M.Pavlov, I.Pavlov, I.Zheltov "Sovetskie Srednie Tanki Dovoennogo Perioda" Armada #7, 2000:

M.Kolomiets, I.Moshanskiy "Mnogobashennie Tanki RKKA" Frontovaya Illustratsiya #5, 2000;

 

tg_08.jpgtg_05.jpg

Edited by intruder
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Guest intruder
a me da oggi non mi visualizza nessuna delle immagini che intruder ha postato..anche in altri topics :blink::blink:

 

Se ti riferisci alle immagini sopra, le vedo tranquillamente, mentre due post su Treni blindati sono sparite tutte le immagini perché la pagina web dove si trovavano non è più disponibile, qualunque cosa voglia dire. Da oggi sto salvando tutto per metterlo su flikr.

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Crossley Armored Car (India Pattern)

 

Ind-CrossleyAC-IndiaPattern.jpg

 

Passing tests, 32 Crossley 1.5 ton trucks were converted by Vickers. These were delivered in 1923 and a further order followed. Total deliveries were about 100. All of these vehicles were fitted with solid tires to reduce the risk of punctures but these were never very successful when used off road due to their narrow profile led to the vehicle sinking up to its axles. Two of the armored cars were also shipped to South Africa where the tires also caused trouble and were eventually changed to pneumatic types. Both of these survive and are in the South African War Museum. The Indian Army vehicle was used by Vickers as the basis for an armored car that could be sold on the export market. Large numbers were sold to Japan where it was known as the Dowa and a smaller number to Argentina. A 6 wheel version was also listed by Vickers and several were sold to Iraq. Vickers also supplied the 1.5 ton Crossley truck as part of an army mechanization package.

Edited by Blue Sky
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The TKS, wz.33

 

Pol-TKS-20mm.jpg

 

Started in 1933, 390 were built. Armor was up to 10 mm and a few were made of cast armor (1934) - revolutionary technology in that age. Between 1936/39 work was carried out to up-gun the tankette by mounting a 20 mm automatic cannon in a large ball mount.The Polish 20mm FK cannon was ready in 1938 and its mounting on TK-3 and TKS tankettes was started in 1939. Twenty three were upgraded before the events of 1939 overtook the upgrade.

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Marmon-Herrington Armored Car

 

sa-mh.jpg

 

SA-MarmonHerrington-mk4F.jpg

 

 

Here is a letter received from a South African Army Officer who disputes the coloring scheme as shown above. It would not be the first time that TANKS! has found printed books to be incorrect. Since he was highly knowledgeable about the Marmon Herrington, I have included it here with minor editing.

In 1938, the government of South Africa ordered the developement of two types of armored cars. Work proceeded slowly until the outbreak of WW2, at this point all work was quickened. Just like the Australians, the South Africans proved themselves exceptional at doing great things with an almost non-existant automotive industry. Orders swelled to 1000, and with only the existing prototypes to work with, finished examples were produced within months. The armored cars were produced by importing Ford truck chassis from Canada, Marmon-Herrington 4 X 4 transmissions from the USA, and armament from the UK. Local assembly was done in railroad workshops and local steel mills.

Model 1 - was a 4 X 2 drive arrangement. The unit was used in action against the Italians in East Africa. These units made a poor showing and were thereafter confined to training only.

Model 2 - known to the British as Armored car, Marmon-Herrington - was a full 4 X 4 car. This model was used extensively in reconnaissance during the North Africa campain. Usually, this was the only vehicle available in any numbers for that purpose. The car was considered by the troops to be under armed and under protected. Local modifications were usually made consisting of extra armor plate and heavier guns. Some going as far as mounting the Italian 20mm Breda cannon, German 37mm cannon, 45mm cannon, and the British 2 pounder. These local modifications were considered successful and some of the changes were added to later models.

Model 3 - incorporated the British 2 pounder as a main cannon as one of the produced models. Others mounted up to 4 Bren guns. Still others served as command and repair vehicles. The Japanese were quick to use this car whenever they captured one.

Model 4 - never went beyond prototype. This unit was heavily inspired by the German 8 wheel armored cars.

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FP-1 and FP-2

 

FP1-1.jpg

 

FP1-2.jpg

 

About 1930 the army was allowed to carry out experiments with armored vehicles again, and this time they built their own armo red trucks. Two Ford AA chassis with twin rear wheels was armored and armed with a 20mm Madsen machinegun. These cars were named FP-1 and FP-2, FP meaning "Forsoegs Panser" or armored experimental. The three pictures shows these cars as they evolved during the three rebuilds. The first version is from 1931. The idea was, that in case of war, suited commercial vehicles were to be given to the army, and armored bodywork was to be fitted on them. This idea was later abandoned, but FP1 and 2 were kept in service right up to WW2, as they were cheap to use, and Denmark only had very few other armored cars.

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Guest intruder

Dimmi che è uno scherzo... come vorrei lo fosse quello sotto ("Italian Fiat heavy tank"): sembra il carro di Leonardo coi cingoli...

 

fiat-2000-02.jpg

Edited by intruder
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Guest intruder
fiat 3000, costruito in soli 2 esemplari. Tipica produzione anni 20....

 

Ti ringrazio per la precisazione. Questa, invece, è tipica produzione sovietica di qualche anno dopo:

 

Soviet_experimental_T-34_made_from_reinforced_concrete.jpg

An experimental T-34 made from reinforced concrete

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Guest intruder

E che dire di questo "coso"? Un qualche prototipo per andare nel fango, immagino.

 

3069d1215028334-stranger-than-fiction-armor-screw_vehicle-1.jpg

 

 

Questo invece è già postato, da qualche parte, ma aver trovato lo spaccato è interessante:

 

1456d1207087546-stranger-than-fiction-armor-a7v-diagram.jpg

 

1457d1207087612-stranger-than-fiction-armor-kp43d.jpg

Edited by intruder
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E che dire di questo "coso"? Un qualche prototipo per andare nel fango, immagino.

credo sia per andare sui campi minati. con quei cosi al posto dei cingoli sarebbe affondato nel fango in pochi minuti.

 

Questo invece è già postato, da qualche parte, ma aver trovato lo spaccato è interessante:

non si vede :(

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Guest intruder

Questo invece era un prototipo costruito da una fabbrica di trattori...

 

Soviettank.jpg

 

 

credo sia per andare sui campi minati. con quei cosi al posto dei cingoli sarebbe affondato nel fango in pochi minuti.

non si vede :(

 

Provo a salvarlo su photobucket e a rimetterlo.

Edited by intruder
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