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Precipitato un F22 a Edwards AFB


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The U.S. Air Force has confirmed an F-22A Raptor crashed about 10 a.m. today around 35 miles northeast of Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., where it was based.

 

The condition of the pilot is unknown at this time, USAF says. A program source tells Aviation Week that the reason the pilot's fate is unknown is because the F-22 was separated from the chase plane at the time of the accident and the chase pilot did not see what happened.

 

The Raptor was on an unidentified test mission. So far it appears to have been a captive carry weapons test by the 412th Test Wing.

 

A USAF statement said a board of officers will investigate the accident. "As soon as additional details of the crash become available, they will be provided," the service said.

 

This is the third crash of an F-22, and the second of a production aircraft. A YF-22 crashed during testing in 1992--the pilot survived without ejecting--and in 2004 a pilot at Nellis AFB was forced to eject shortly after takeoff. The Nellis crash grounded the F-22 fleet for two weeks.

 

The Air Force currently has 134 F-22s in its inventory.

 

 

 

www.aviationweek.com

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Aggiornamento sull'incidente da aviationweek:

 

Some senior U.S. Air Force officials were notified yesterday that there was no pilot ejection from the F-22 that crashed near Edwards AFB Base.

 

The Lockheed Martin pilot was declared dead at the hospital which seemed to indicate he was killed after ejection, but officials at Edwards said that statement was simply a pro forma statement for the investigation. USAF officials said the report of no ejection came soon after the crash, but almost immediately a complete security blanket was dropped over the investigation and no more data has been revealed.

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perchè dovrebbero? sono dei velivoli molto costosi, meglio un' F-35 che costa di meno e ha più o meno le stesse caratteristiche.

l'america ha già programmato per la marina degli F-35 per la loro caratteristica (VTOL) da mettere sulle portaerei in futuro.

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perchè dovrebbero? sono dei velivoli molto costosi, meglio un' F-35 che costa di meno e ha più o meno le stesse caratteristiche.

l'america ha già programmato per la marina degli F-35 per la loro caratteristica (VTOL) da mettere sulle portaerei in futuro.

 

Rettificando....

 

Gli USA adotteranno tutte le versioni dell'F-35: A, B, C.

 

La US Navy adotterà la versione C, che differisce dalla A e dalla B, ma non di certo per essere un velivolo a decollo e atterraggio verticale (Vertical-Take Ogg-Landing VTOL) essendo un velivolo a decollo e atterraggio convenzionale esattamente come la versione A.

 

I Marines, corpo molto distinto dalla marina, loro sì adotteranno la versione B che però è a decollo corto e atterraggio verticale (Short-Take Off-Vertical-Landing STOVL)

 

L'F-35 sostituirà tutti i velivoli della flotta USAF...meno il Raptor.

 

....

 

sei vagamente fuori argomento.

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Rettificando....

 

Gli USA adotteranno tutte le versioni dell'F-35: A, B, C.

 

La US Navy adotterà la versione C, che differisce dalla A e dalla B, ma non di certo per essere un velivolo a decollo e atterraggio verticale (Vertical-Take Ogg-Landing VTOL) essendo un velivolo a decollo e atterraggio convenzionale esattamente come la versione A.

 

I Marines, corpo molto distinto dalla marina, loro sì adotteranno la versione B che però è a decollo corto e atterraggio verticale (Short-Take Off-Vertical-Landing STOVL)

 

L'F-35 sostituirà tutti i velivoli della flotta USAF...meno il Raptor.

 

....

 

sei vagamente fuori argomento.

io avevo sentito diversamente un bel po di tempo fa quindi magari sn cambiate un pò le cose...

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  • 5 months later...

Sono stati emessi i risultati dell'inchiesta sull'incidente del 25 Marzo, in sostanza il pilota ha perso conoscenza durante la terza fase di test, ad elevati numeri di g.

 

- - -

 

July 31, 2009 (by AFMC) - Air Force Materiel Command officials released an accident investigation report that determined that human factors associated with high gravitational forces caused the March 25 crash of an F-22 test aircraft 35 miles outside of Edwards AFB.

 

The test pilot, David Cooley, a Lockheed Martin employee, was killed in the mishap.

 

Mr. Cooley was a former Air Force pilot with significant flight experience, including in the F-22. The aircraft, assigned to the Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards AFB, was destroyed. Total cost of the aircraft, equipment damage and property restoration has been estimated at $155 million.

 

According to the report, Mr. Cooley was conducting high-G maneuvers, which test aircraft capabilities and integrated equipment, prior to the accident. Witness statements, voice and telemetry data and simulations show he completed two of three planned tests. During his third test maneuver, however, he appeared to have been subjected to increased physiological stressors associated with high-G maneuvers, according to the report.

 

The board concluded this led to an "almost" loss of consciousness and lack of situational awareness, causing Mr. Cooley to delay his aircraft recovery maneuver.

 

The report states, "The [mission test pilot] regained partial [situational awareness] and attempted a late recovery from the test maneuver but determined there was inadequate altitude for a safe recovery and ejected."

 

Due to the speed of the aircraft and the windblast, the pilot immediately sustained fatal, blunt force trauma injuries upon ejection.

 

The accident board concluded that the aircraft itself was functioning normally and that there were no design or airworthiness issues that would impact the safe operation of the F-22 fleet.

 

"The loss of Mr. Cooley is tragic and keenly felt by everyone who knew him," said Maj. Gen. David W. Eidsaune, the Accident Investigation Board president. He was a superior test pilot and a member of the Air Force family. His service as a test pilot helped enhance the capabilities of fighter aircraft. Our thoughts and prayers continue to include the Cooley family."

 

 

 

 

Courtesy of Air Force Materiel Command Public Affairs

 

 

fonte: http://www.f-16.net/news_article3687.html

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