Jump to content

Squadron patch/insigna


saville

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 806
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Guest intruder

squadron_insignia.jpg

 

SAAF, 6 Squadron

"Pasop" (Beware)

 

Formed as a shadow fighter unit equipped with Westland Wapiti IIIs at Cape Town in April 1939, its first duties at the outbreak of the war consisted of flying anti-submarine coastal patrols from Youngsfield. In February the unit ceased to exist when it moved to Waterkloof and renumbered 1 Squadron. On 26 February 1942, 6 Squadron was formed at Swartkop with the Curtiss Mohawk IV. Moving to Stanger on the east coast and then to Eerste River in the Cape, the squadron flew Wapitis, Fairey Battles and Hawker Hartbees. The squadron was disbanded on 31 July 1943 when the threat of a Japanese invasion receded.

 

On 5 July 1952 the squadron was reformed as a citizen force unit, flying Harvards from Port Elizabeth. In 1959 the squadron was disbanded once again, but in May 1961 it was reformed, again flying Harvards. From 1973 to 1976 the squadron flew a lone Cessna 185, but in March 1975 it began receiving the Impala Mk I. The squadron was disbanded in October 1990, still resident at Port Elizabeth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder
VMA-311 Tomcats

 

vmf311.jpg

 

Sylvester the Pussycat - 1950's

Drawn by Bud Southworth

 

Non si vede, o è a scoppio ritardato...

 

squadron_insignia.jpg

 

SAAF, 5 Squadron

"Difficultates Aspiciemus" (We Shall Confront All Difficulties)

 

Although formed as a fighter-bomber unit in Cape Town in April 1939, the squadron was disbanded in December 1939. However, on 7 May 1941 the squadron, known as 'the Chakas' after the Zulu warrior-king, was reformed at Swartkop. Flying Mohawk IVs, the squadron left for Egypt in December 1941. Re-equipped with Tomahawk IIbs, they were given the role of maritime partol in February 1942. In mid-1942 the squadron was retasked as a fighter unit in the Western Desert, still flying the Tomahawk. Transfering to Kittyhawks at the end of 1942, the squadron concentrated on the ground-attack role. With the war in Africa over, the squadron moved to Malta for the invasion of Sicily and then to Sicily itself. In October 1943 the squadron moved to Italy itself. During 1944 the squadron converted to the Mustang III (later Mustang IV) and used them over Italy and Yugoslavia. The Chakas were disbanded at the end of the war.

 

Reformed in December 1950, the squadron operated as a citizen force unit in Durban. flying Harvards. In July 1973 they re-equipped with the Impala Mk I, while in early 1981 they received Impala Mk IIs. In 1988 the Impala's were swopped for the new Cheetah E operating from AFB Louis Trichardt, but sadly this proud squadron was disbanded during the round of squadron closures in 1992.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder

squadron_insignia.jpg

 

SAAF, 4 Squadron

"Mors Hosti" (Death to the Enemy)

 

Equipped with the Hawker Hartbees, Hawker Fury and a few Wapitis, Four Squadron was formed in April 1939 at Durban. Disbanded in December 1939, the squadron was reformed at AFB Waterkloof on 24 March 1941 with Hurricanes. Operational training in East Africa was undertaken with the Curtiss Mowhawk before going to Egypt to convert to Tomahawks. In November 1941 the squadron went into action in the Western Desert and later moved to Italy, by then flying Kittyhawks and later Spitfires. Disbandenment came in October 1945 while the squadron was still in Italy.

 

Reformed in January 1951 at Waterkloof as the Active Citizen force element of 1 Squadron with Harvards and Spitfires, the squadron disbanded once again in October 1958.

 

On 1 November 1961, the squadron reformed at Swartkop, flying Harvards. In August 1972 the first Impalas were received and the squadron later moved to Waterkloof. The squadron moved house once again to Lanseria Airport, but was disbanded in September 1991.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder

squadron_insignia.jpg

 

SAAF, 3 Squadron

"Semper Pugnans" (Always Fighting)

 

One of the SAAFs front-line squadrons for many years, 3 Squadron was formed in January 1939 at AFB Waterkloof equipped with the Hawker Hartbees and Hurricane Mk II. In September 1939 the squadron moved to Port Elizabeth before being disbanded, only to be reformed at Waterkloof once again on 9 September 1940 with Hurricane Mk 1s. By October the squadron was involved in fighting in East Africa. Flying both Hurricanes and Gladiator Mk IIs, the squadron fought all the way through Somaliland and Abasynia and by the end of 1941 had destroyed over 100 Italian aircraft (24 in air combat). After moving to Asmara, the squadron was disbanded. The squadron was reformed in December 1942 and sent to the Middle East. Flying fighter defence over the port of Aden with Hurricane 11c and Spitfire V aircraft, coastal patrols were also flown from North Africa. Re-equipped with Spitfire IXs in August 1944, 3 Squadron was sent to Italy. Most of its operations involved strafing sorties. Disbanding followed at the end of the Second War War.

 

Three Squadron was reformed at Baragwanath Airport on 6 September 1952 as a part-time citizen force unit flying Harvards, but disbanded once again in 1957.

 

In August 1966 the squadron was reformed at AFB Waterkloof as a unit under the control of 2 Squadron, equipped with some Mirage IIIEZs. In February 1970 the unit received squadron colours and in the same year, hardware in the form of the Mirage IIIDZ. The squadron was reactivated as an autonomous squadron in February 1975, receiving the Mirage F1CZ in April 1975 when its Mirage IIIEZ, DZ and D2Z aircraft were transferred to 85 Advanced Flying School. The squadron continued to operate the Mirage F1CZ from Waterkloof AFB with frequent deployments to Namibia during the Border War. Three Squadron was disbanded when the Mirage F1CZs were retired on 30 September 1992.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder

squadron_insignia.jpg

 

SAAF, 109 Squadron

 

Established as 109 Air Commando on 24 September 1963 at Mosselbaai. The unit was staffed by volunteer aircrew flying civilian aircraft.

 

With effect from 1st October 1968 control of 109 Commando Squadron passed from the SA Army to the S.A.A.F. The squadron came under total control of Tactical Group. Transferred to Light Aircraft Command, S.A.A.F. in 1970.

 

Based at Mossel Bay. Came under control of AFB Ysterplaat.

 

In terms of S.A.A.F. HQ "Plan 90" 109 Commando Squadrons was destined to disband.

 

109 Squadron terminated most flying operations on 31st January 1993.

 

The squadron was disbanded on 31st March 1993. Suitable members were transferred to 105 and 108 Commando Squadrons.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder

squadron_insignia.jpg

 

SAAF 11 Squadron

"Ne Desit Virtus" (Let Courage not Fail)

 

Formed as a fighter-bomber unit in April 1939 at Durban with Wapitis, by December that year it had already been disbanded. By renumbering 1 (Bomber/Fighter) Squadron to 11 (Bomber) Squadron on 11 December 1939, the squadron was activated once again and by May 1940 was equipped with the Hartbees, moving to Nairobi. During August they re-equipped with the Fairey Battle, with the majority of operations occuring over Italian East Africa. Despite an impressive record, the squadron was renumbered 15 Squadron in May 1941. Reformed in June 1944 in the Middle East with Spitfire Mk Vs, the squadron moved to Italy in September where they converted to the Kittyhawk Mk IV. With the collapse of the Axis, the squadron was disbanded in mid 1945.

 

In January 1974, the squadron was reformed with Cessna 185s at Potchefstroom. The squadron was disbanded in early 1991.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder

squadron_insignia.jpg

 

SAAF, 114 Commando Squadron

 

The unit was staffed by volunteer aircrew flying civilian aircraft.

 

The idea of a commando squadron staffed by woman originated with Mrs. Ingrid Heinz. After ten years of unsucsessfull bartering the head of the Air Force, Genl. R.H.D. Rogers approve the plan during November 1975. The idea became fesable after a visit by women pilots to the Dunnottar base middel 1974. During this visit the woman had a chance to convince some sinior Air Force officers of their plan. The plan was proposed to Mr. P.W. Botha in January 1975 and the prosess was officially started.

 

Ministerial approval was granted on 28 January 1976 for the establishment of a Commando squadron staffed by women aircrew. On 20 February 1976 a directive was issued by Chief of AF for the formation of 114 Squadron.

 

A special selection board was held on 28 October 1976 attended by 20 woman pilots. Four pilots were selected: Val Humphreys of Ngodwana, Eastern Transvaal; Yvonne van den Dool of Tzaneen; Rita du Plessis of Delmas and E. Amalie van Maltitz of Johannesburg. An additional five members was selected by formation date: mrs. M.H. Brooks, I. Heinz, Jeanette E. Fraser-Jones and miss J. Manning all from Johannesburg and P.A. Hoffman of Pretoria. Rita du Plessis did not join. The first squadron memberes were appointed on 21 December 1996.

 

The establishment of 114 Commando Squadron was annouced on 4 January 1977 by AFHQ.

 

Tasked with visual reconnassance causualty evacuation, search and rescue and dropping of supplies and messages. The recurement for joining the squadron were to be fully bilingual, between 18 and 60 years of age, have access to an aircraft, minimum of 150 solo flying hours. They had to fly a minimum of 24 hours a year to maintain proficiency, attend four hours training each year and do 10 hours a year of an annual training camp. The squadron was to consist of 20 pilots and 5 observers.

 

Controlled by Light Aircraft Command in 1970's.

 

8 Candidate officers commenced training iro officers orientation course on 2 February 1997. From 14 to 18 March 1977 the members did their first weak of basic training at S.T.T. Flying training commenced at Lanseria on 2 April 1977 and was completed at AFS Potchefstroom. The first S.A.A.F. Commando Pilot Wings were awarded to women pilots of 114 Commando Squadron on 16 June 1977 at Potchefstroom.

 

During July 1977 the pilots attended a navigation course at 80 ANS, becoming the first woman to attend a course at this unit.

 

On 13 August 1977 the Squadron held its first parade at Lanseria. 114 Sqn HQ was officially opened on 11 November 1977. The squadron performed its first mission on 15/16 March 1978, flying five officers from AFHQ to Durban.

 

In 1979 B Flight was formed in Natal.

 

During the flying camp of 1979 at Messina two members of B Flight lost their way and ended up in Mozambique.

 

After the disbandment of Light Aircraft Command at the end of 1979 the squadron with 102 and 104 sqn came under control of AFB Swartkop.

 

During 1981 members of 114 manned the ops room at Windhoek.

 

On 12 November 1981 B Flight was transferred to 105 Sqn.

 

In terms of the S.A.A.F. rationalization program, known as "Plan 90", 114 Commando Squadron was ordered to disband by 31st December 1990. In the end the squadron was disbanded some time before this date, on 31st March 1990. A closing down parade was held on 18 June 1990. Suitable personnel were transferred to other commando squadrons, mostly 104 and 111 Commando Squadrons.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder

aussieisaf.jpg

Afghanistan 2007/08, Australian. Subdued ISAF Patch on velcro Locally made in Afghansitan.

 

aussieisaf2.jpgaussieisaf1.jpg

Australian Army Special Forces issue ISAF Afghanistan challenge coin

Side one reads -ISAF S.O.F AFGHANISTAN ,

Side 2 reads - ISAF SOF AFGHANISTAN .

2007/2008

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder

squadron_insignia.jpg

 

SAAF 42 Squadron

"Per Spicimus" (We Survey)

 

 

The only army aviation unit to serve in the South African forces during World War II, 42 AOP Flight was formed at Bari, Italy, on 23 January 1945, with an officer of the SA Artillery in command. Most of the pilots were drawn from the SAAF and were given special training for their artillery-spotting duties. Flying Austers, the squadron was kept busy until the end of the war in Europe, moving from one base to the next as the Germans retreated in Italy.

 

With the end of the war, 42 Flight and their Austers were shipped back to South Africa and were based at Potchefstroom, the home of the South African Artillery. Its first two purely Army pilots were trained at the SAAF's Central Flying School in 1949, with the flight flying various marques of Auster. For a while the Flight was placed under the control of the SAAF, but in 1953 it reverted back to the Army for a few years before being passed back to the SAAF as 42 Squadron. Auster AOP-6s and 9s entered service between 1953 and 1957.

 

In May 1962 the Austers were phased out by the Cessna 185, being joined by the Bosbok in 1974 and later by the Kudu. The Kudu was retired in 1991, followed by the Bosbok in 1992. In the last few months of service of the Bosbok, the squadron formed the 'Spikes' formation team to showcase the performance qualities of their much underrated aircraft. The squadron moved to AFB Swartkop in December 1992, flying the Cessna 185. A single Pilatus PC-6, formerly of the Bophuthatswana (homeland) Defence Force, joined the squadron following the 1994 elections. The squadron relocated to AFB Waterkloof in early 2000, wereafter it was disbanded.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder

squadron_insignia.jpg

 

SAAF 31 Squadron

"Absque metu" (Without fear)

 

Established as No. 31 (Coastal) Squadron by amalgamating No. 13 (B.R.) Squadron and No. 14 (B.R.) Squadron with effect from 1st Desember 1939. Allotted to Natal and Eastern Province Commands. No. 13 (B.R.) Squadron was redesignated "A" Flight, No. 31 (Coastal) Squadron at Durban and No. 14 (B.R.) Squadron was redesignated "B" Flight, No. 31 (Coastal) Squadron at Port Elizabeth. Joint HQ with No. 32 (Coastal) Squadron formed at Germiston and operated Junkers Ju 86's and a single Blenheim Mk 1. The Blenheim, allocated to "A" Flight at Durban was used to attack the Italian ship Timaryo, on 10 June 1940. The ship was run aground by her crew during the engagement. The Junkers were replaced by Avro Ansons and the squadron's two flights were formed into separated entities again on 1 September 1940 when "A" Flight was redesignated No. 31 Coastal Reconnaissance Flight at Durban and "B" Flight was redesignated No. 33 Coastal Reconnaissance Flight at Port Elizabeth.

 

In April 1941 No. 31 Coastal Flight came under control of No. 6 Wing, controlled by No. 5 Coastal Group. On 1 July 1942 No. 31 Coastal Reconnaissance Flight was disbanded and renamed No. 22 Torpedo Bomber Reconnaissance Squadron.

 

Re-established as No. 31 Heavy Bomber Squadron in January 1944 at Zwartkop Air Station. The squadron departed for North Africa from 30th January 1944 and started arriving at the SAAF Base Depot at Almaza from 19th February 1944. The aircrews were sent to No. 1675 Conversion Unit at Lydda, Palestine to be converted onto the Consolidated B-24 Liberator bomber. On 19th April 1944 an Advanced Party set off to establish a base camp forty kilometers north of Cairo. The camp was accordingly named Kilo 40. The first aircraft arrived at Kilo 40 on 27th April 1944. After the arrival of No. 34 Squadron at Kilo 40, both squadrons came under the controll of the newly established No. 2 Wing, SAAF. The squadron flew its first operational sorties on 27th May 1944 against the German-occupied island of Crete. From 16th June 1944 the squadron started the migration proses to Foggia in southern Italy. The bombers and a small detachment were immediately flown to Foggia and put on operations as part of No. 205 Group, RAF. 31 Squadron was temporary placed under control of No. 240 Wing, RAF until No. 2 Wing came into full operation. The squadron took part in a large-scale air offensive against the petroleum industry in eastern European countries supporting Nazi Germany. From 1st July 1944 the squadron also became involved in occasional mine-laying sorties along the Danube river. No. 31 Squadron came under effective control of No. 2 Wing, SAAF during July 1944. First operations against the Ploesti oilfields of Rumania commenced on 26th July 1944.

 

The Squadron (with 34 Sqn) is most famous, along with the USAAF squadrons, and RAF 178 squadron, for flying to Warsaw with supplies during the uprising of the Polish resistance under General Bor Komorowski for which the Squadrons suffered heavy losses in August 1944. The Squadrons also dropped supplies to the Yugoslavian resistance under Marshal Tito in the later part of the War.

 

Moved to Foggia - dropping supplies, attacks on marshalling yards. Troop transporting to Greece during the E.L.A.S. flare up. After the end of the war in Europe the squadron was utilized in a trooping role and to repatriate POW's to England. Withdrawn from operations on 5th December 1945 and disbanded 6th December 1945.

 

Reformed as 31 Squadron with effect from 4th January 1982 at AFB Hoedspruit, operating Puma and Alouette III helicopters. The squadron later moved to AFB Louis Trichardt. The Pumas were replaced by the Oryx on 12 February 1991. The squadron was disbanded at on 4 December 1992.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest intruder

squadron_insignia.jpg

 

SAAF 32 Squadron

[i"Summa Agilitas"[/i](The highest agility / Unequaled Versatility)

 

The forerunner of 30 Squadron (SAAF), No 223 Squadron, RAF, was established in April 1944. No. 30 Squadron, SAAF, was established on 10th July 1944 by redesignating No. 223 Squadron, RAF, at Pescara, Italy.

 

Controlled by No. 3 Wing, SAAF, they relocated to Jesi in October 1944, concentrating on raids against communications and railway links in Yugoslavia and Northern Italy. The last operational flight occurred during April 1945 from Jesi, Italy and was withdrawn from operations on 3rd May 1945. After the end of operations the squadron was utilized for transport duties and carried on doing exercises. It relocated at Biferno in June 1945 and disbanded 15th July 1945.

 

The squadron was re-established on 8th Desember 1980 at AFB Ysterplaat with the transfer and renumbering of 'A' Flight, 15 Squadron from Swartkop, operating the Super Frelon and Puma. The squadron was also responsibile for Antarctic support missions, flying two SA 330J Puma's owned by the Department of Evironmental Affairs. The Puma became the sole type operated when the Super Frelons were transferred to 15 Squadron in January 1986. The squadron was disbanded with effect from 31st Desember 1991 when the Pumas and personnel was transferred to 22 Squadron.

 

 

EDIT: Per qualche ragione strana è venuto doppio il post precedente, ho sostituito in questo un altro testo così da non doverlo cancellare.

Edited by intruder
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...