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Grillo


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It was a slow, quiet, electrically driven boat inspired by the British rhomboid tanks. It combined the flat-bottomed hull of a landing craft with a pair of 45-cm torpedoes in side-dropping gear and two hook-studded, engine-driven chains mounted on either side of the hull. The Grillo could approach boom defenses quietly and clamber over them, much like a tank crushing barbed wire. Once inside the anchorage, it would attack with its torpedoes and retire the way it came. The Grillo was not very successful in action. The chain mechanism produced a frightful clatter that all but negated the advantage of the silent, 15-hp electric motor. They were usually destroyed by shellfire before they got over the booms. Nevertheless, the Austrian navy was interested enough to raise and copy a sunken example.

 

 

grillodf.jpggrillo.gif

 

 

While the war was raging on the battlefields of Europe, and submarines were terrorising the ships on the high seas, the Austro-Hungarian fleet and Italian fleet lay mostly well protected in their harbours, surrounded by mine-fields and anti-submarine nets. This passivity was, in the main, due to the ongoing submarine war. In 1915, after Italy had severed its connections with its German and Austrian allies, and joined the English-French Alliance, Italian naval officers had thought long and hard about how the Austro-Hungarian fleet could be attacked in the harbour.

 

 

The first attempt, carried out from Venice, on 13/14 May 1918, was made by the Italian naval Commander Pellegrine, who, with three other crew members in a motor-boat, tried to attack the Austro-Hungarian fleet in Pola. Pellegine's boat Grillo was equipped with caterpillar tracks which enabled it to crawl up over the various barriers in Pola. Two torpedoes, which hung on the side of the boat, were to be sent against the ships in the harbour. Pellegrine's attempt failed because the boat was discovered as it was forcing a barrier. Pellegrine and his crew spent the rest of the war in captivity.

 

 

 

M Williamson

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It was a slow, quiet, electrically driven boat inspired by the British rhomboid tanks. It combined the flat-bottomed hull of a landing craft with a pair of 45-cm torpedoes in side-dropping gear and two hook-studded, engine-driven chains mounted on either side of the hull. The Grillo could approach boom defenses quietly and clamber over them, much like a tank crushing barbed wire. Once inside the anchorage, it would attack with its torpedoes and retire the way it came. The Grillo was not very successful in action. The chain mechanism produced a frightful clatter that all but negated the advantage of the silent, 15-hp electric motor. They were usually destroyed by shellfire before they got over the booms. Nevertheless, the Austrian navy was interested enough to raise and copy a sunken example.

 

 

 

 

 

While the war was raging on the battlefields of Europe, and submarines were terrorising the ships on the high seas, the Austro-Hungarian fleet and Italian fleet lay mostly well protected in their harbours, surrounded by mine-fields and anti-submarine nets. This passivity was, in the main, due to the ongoing submarine war. In 1915, after Italy had severed its connections with its German and Austrian allies, and joined the English-French Alliance, Italian naval officers had thought long and hard about how the Austro-Hungarian fleet could be attacked in the harbour.

 

 

The first attempt, carried out from Venice, on 13/14 May 1918, was made by the Italian naval Commander Pellegrine, who, with three other crew members in a motor-boat, tried to attack the Austro-Hungarian fleet in Pola. Pellegine's boat Grillo was equipped with caterpillar tracks which enabled it to crawl up over the various barriers in Pola. Two torpedoes, which hung on the side of the boat, were to be sent against the ships in the harbour. Pellegrine's attempt failed because the boat was discovered as it was forcing a barrier. Pellegrine and his crew spent the rest of the war in captivity.

 

Interessante Intru, ma hai copiato letteralmente tutto dal seguente link! :blink:

 

Grillo (cricket)

 

Penso che potevi almeno indicare la fonte d'origine!

Edited by Blue Sky
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Guest intruder
ricordo che bisogna SEMPRE postare il link dell'articolo da cui si prende una notizia, un trafiletto o un intero paragrafo. la prossima volta scattano le punizioni. ;)

 

 

Come ho scritto sopra, il sito in questione è sparito prima che riuscissi di finire il copia e incolla, e postare un sito che non esisteva più non aveva molto senso. A quanto pare è ricomparso, ma non potevo saperlo, alcuni spariscono e non si vedono più... ho messo il nome dell'autore dell'articolo.

 

EDIT: come vi avevo segnalato quando ho chiesto di coreeggere il sottotitolo, si era inchiodato tutto mentre inviavo il topic, una parte del sottotitolo è saltata (l'avete corretta voi su mia segnalazione), e, a quanto pare, non ha caricato le modifiche che gli avevo fatto con questa considerazione (sparizione del sito dal quale avevo preso tutto, eccetera) Non ne ho colpa se il computer o la rete o la connessione danno i numeri. Continuo a segnalare i problemi tecnici di questo forum, ma a quanto pare, non sono risolvibili.

Edited by intruder
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