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Helicopter Combat Support Squadron 4 (HC-4) was a United States Navy helicopter squadron based at Naval Air Station Norfolk, Virginia. Nicknamed the "Black Stallions", they flew the MH-53E Sea Dragon.

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Helicopter Combat Support Special Squadron Five has the mission of conducting flight and ground training to maintain maximum readiness for immediate employment conduction Combat Search and Rescue and Naval Special Warfare operations and support of United States Forces for crisis response, mobilization, and Fleet contributory support. They conduct airborne operations in support of air strike operations; conduct Combat Search and Rescue operations in a combat environment and Search and Rescue operations in a non-combat environment; conduct Navy Special Warfare operations in support of other strike operations; conduct general surveillance; coordinate and conduct multi-unit Search and Rescue operations; and conduct Fleet training for Carrier Air Wings and Reserve Carrier Air Wings for Combat Search and Rescue and non-combat Search and Rescue.

 

The "Firehawks" of Helicopter Combat Support Special Squadron 5 deployed to Iraq in March 2003, the first time th unit had mobilized and deployed since Operations Desert Storm/Desert Shield. HCS-5 was the first naval air squadron deployed to Iraq, and the Firehawks still remain in theater. HCS-5 is one of two squadrons in the Navy dedicated to Naval Special Warfare support, and combat search and rescue. The unit deployed with 75 individuals. The unit supported US Central Command, Special Operations Command Central and Joint Special Operations Air Component. The majority of their flights in the Iraqi theater have been supporting special operations ground forces missions, both in urban and rural areas. The Firehawks have also participated in military operations in urban terrain, and helped with medical and casualty evacuations. Altogether, they have flown more than 390 sorties and logged more than 850 flight hours.

 

 

 

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/hcs-5.htm

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Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Eighty Four has the Mission to provide ready detachments for deployment aboard Fleet frigates. These detachments provide anti-submarine warfare, anti-ship surveillance and targeting, and general utility support to air capable ships. They localize, track and attack submarine forces; coordinate and control the operations of the task organization or functional force to carry out assigned missions; conduct electronic warfare support operations; engage surface targets during battle group operations in coordination with other forces; and conduct Search andRescue operations in a non-combat environment.

 

The two HSL squadrons (LAMPS) at Willow Grove and San Diego were decommissioned in FY-2001.

 

 

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/age...navy/hsl-84.htm

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815th Airlift Squadron.

 

 

Prior to the 53rd WRS being reactivated, the 815th served as a Weather Reconnaissance Squadron from 1975 until 1993. Upon the 53rd WRS's activation, the 815th assumed an airlift mission.

 

In September 1994, a scant two months after the 815th Airlift Squadron support of Operation Provide Promise ended, the squadron was flying out again in support of an overseas operation - Uphold Democracy - in Haiti. Rather than airlifting combat forces to Haiti, as originally planned, the crews transported peacekeepers and supplies to staging areas near the island nation.

 

In November 1994, crews from the 815th Airlift Squadron found themselves back in Turkey, supporting supply missions between Rhein-Main AB, Germany, and Incirlik AB, Turkey. Many of the supplies flown in were in support of Operation Provide Comfort, a Kurdish relief effort in Northern Iraq.

 

 

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/usaf/815as.htm

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48th Tactical Airflit Squadron

 

The 48th Airlift Squadron (48 AS) is part of the 314th Airlift Wing at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas. It operates C-130J Super Hercules aircraft, conducting pilot and loadmaster training for airlift and airdrop operations.

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The 132nd Air Refueling Squadron was originally consituted as the 528th BS (Dive). It was activated in March 1942 at Rogers Field, OK.

 

During the course of World War II, the 528th took part in combat operations in the CBI theater before being inactivated at Fort Lawton, WA in January 1946.

 

Reconstituted as the 132nd Fighter Squadron, the unit was alloted to the Maine National Guard and federally recognized at Dow Field, Bangor, ME, on February 5, 1947.

 

The 132nd was called to active duty as a result of the Korean war and tasked with providing air defense for the Northeast United States from Dow AFB, ME. The squadron eventually returned under state control on November 1, 1951 while remaining at Dow AFB.

 

The squadron was reassigned to Air Defense Command in July 1960 and reaching group status as the 101st Fighter Interceptor Gropup in December of 1960.

 

The mission of the 132nd changed in 1976 to an air refueling one as the squadron transitioned to the KC-135A aircraft. During that period, the squadron was reassigned to Strategic Air Command on April 1, 1976.

 

The 132nd converted to the KC-135E in 1985.

 

The squadron was called to active duty as part of Operations Desert Shield/Storm.

 

The squadrong was redesignated as the 132nd Air Refueling Squadron in March 1992 before being reassigned, along with its parent wing, the 101st Air Refueling Wing, to Air Mobility Command in June 1992.

 

 

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/age...usaf/132ars.htm

 

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A sinistra patch ufficiale, a destra quello spesso usato sugli aerei.

 

 

The 190th Air Refueling Wing traces its origins to the 440th Bombardment Squadron (Light) -- a Harrisburg, Pennsylvania unit -- flew the B-26 aircraft in Africa, Sicily, Italy, and France during World War II. Based in Okinawa at the end of the war, it was reorganized as the 117th Bombardment Squadron (Light) and stationed at the Philadelphia Municipal Airport.

 

The unit was ordered to active federal service at Langley AFB during the Korean Conflict, returning to Pennsylvania afterward. Reactivated as the 117th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Kansas Air National Guard in 1957, the unit flew the F-80 from Hutchinson Naval Air Station. The 117th was re-equipped with the RB-57 in 1958 and, in 1962, was redesigned as the 190th Tactical Reconnaissance Group.

 

The group was transferred to Forbes AFB near Topeka in 1967 and, in 1972, was the only military unit in the world equipped with the day/night-capable B-57G bomber. In April 1974, the unit converted to EB-57B aircraft and became the 190th Defense Systems Evaluation Group. The aircraft was equipped with electronic countermeasures equipment and the mission was penetration and evaluation of US air and ground defense capabilities.

 

The arrival of the first KC-135 Stratotanker in 1978 heralded the still-current air refueling mission. In 1990, the 190th was the first unit to arrive at Jeddah, Saudi Arabia for service during operations Desert Shield/Desert Storm. During 1999, the 190th deployed twice to Turkey in support of Operation Northern Watch, refueling Allied aircraft over the northern No-Fly Zone in Iraq.

 

In its 2005 BRAC Recommendations, DoD recommended to realign McConnell Air National Guard (ANG) Base by relocating the 184th Air Refueling Wing (ANG) nine KC-135R aircraft to the 190th Air Refueling Wing at Forbes Field AGS, which would retire its eight assigned KC-135E aircraft. The 184th Air Refueling Wing 's operations and maintenance manpower would transfer with the aircraft to Forbes, while the wing's expeditionary combat support (ECS) elements would remain at McConnell. Additional aircraft at McConnell would capitalize on available excess capacity at no cost and optimize three squadrons for greater total wing capability. Realigning ANG KC-135R aircraft from McConnell to Forbes (35) would replace aging, higher maintenance KC-135E aircraft with newer models while retaining the experienced personnel from one of the highest-ranking reserve component tanker bases.

 

In another recommendation, DoD recommended to realign Portland IAP AGS, OR. It would realign the 939th Air Refueling Wing (AFR) by distributing the wing’s KC-135R aircraft to the 190th Air Refueling Wing (ANG), Forbes Field AGS, KS (three aircraft) and another installation. This recommendation would realign Portland's KC-135R tanker aircraft to Forbes Field (35) because it had a higher military value than Portland (71) for the tanker mission, and the installation would remain operationally effective due to their proximity to air refueling missions. This recommendation would robust the Air National Guard squadron size at Forbes, increasing the unit's capability.

 

 

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/age...usaf/190arw.htm

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The 757th Airlift Squadron was on an Active Duty Mission from the 1940's to 1973. The unit was assigned to the USAF Reserve in 1973.

 

The unit relocated in 1992 from 907 AW Rickenbacker ANGB OH to 910AW at Youngstown Air Reserve Station, OH.

 

The mission of the 757th Airlift Squadron is to maintain a large-area fixed-wing aerial application capability to control disease vectors in combat areas and on DoD installations; to maintain a large-area application capability to control vegetation and pests of vegetation on DoD installations; and to provide aerial spray training.

 

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/usaf/757as.htm

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Special Boat Team-22 was established Oct. 2002 as a result of NSW-21 force restructure changes. The Team is located at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. SBT-22 is comprised of SOCR, CAC and PBL combatant craft and deploys its SBDs regularly to Central America and South America and the Middle East. Because SBT-22 is now the only NSW Riverine unit it can be deployed to any riverine environment in the world.

 

Special Boat Team 22 began its history as Coastal River Divison-22 in 1972 in New Orleans La. In 1979 it became Special Boat Unit - 22. The Team's long history in Riverine warfare is distinguished in Counter-Narcotic Operations in Central and South America. SBT-22 was a frontline unit in IRAQI FREEDOM 2003 and continues to serve as a frontline unit in the Global War on Terrorism.

 

http://www.warboats.org/SBT22.htm

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VAL-4 was a Light Attack Squadron was commissioned on January 3, 1969 at NAS North Island and was initially designated VA(L)-4. Their first aircraft, BuNo 155461, was also received on that date. Known as the Black Ponies, VAL-4 operated in III and IV CORPS, RVN from April 1969 in support of Navy SEAL and Riverine operations in the Mekong River delta. The squadron had two detachments, Det. "A" assigned to the Air Force Base at Binh Thuy and Det. "B" assigned at the Vung Tau Army Airfield. New facilities for VAL-4 on the Vietnamese Air Force Base at Binh Thuy and the consolidation of VAL-4's operating units lead to the disestablishment of Det. "B" on July 1, 1970. The last combat mission was flown on March 31, 1972 and the unit was deactivated on April 10. VAL-4's 14 assigned Broncos were soon returned to duty with the Marine Corps.

 

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