Vai al contenuto

belumosi

Membri
  • Numero messaggi

    46
  • Registrato

  • Ultima Visita

Reputazione

0

Che riguarda belumosi

  • Rango
    Recluta
  1. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    Tu mi hai convinto in ogni intervento che hai fatto! Hai una competenza tecnica di gran lunga superiore alla mia e specie quest'ultimo post (integrato alle comunicazioni dell'USAF), mi ha chiarito meglio le idee. Quello su cui probabilmente io e te (e Paperinik), avremo eterne divergenze è l'approccio alla soluzione del problema: Cito le ultime righe del tuo post: "In base a come verranno utilizzati gli aerei col longherone sottodimensionato, alle esigenze operative dei reparti, alle tempistiche del programma di riparazione, a quelle di avvicendamento con il nuovo F-22, si deciderà quanti e quali F-15 riparare e quando ripararli...combinando restrizioni all'inviluppo di volo, attenta pianificazione dell'utilizzo dei velivoli e sostituzione dei longheroni... Il tutto cercando di non intaccare l'operatività dei reparti e senza puzza di bruciato..." Diciamo che secondo me oltre a tutte le variabili che hai correttamente elencato, ci sono quelle inconfessabili e fanno tutti capo a due parole strettamente legate: politica e soldi. Entro certi limiti, rimane uno spazio di manovra per tutti gli "attori" che hanno un ruolo nella vicenda: politici, militari e imprese. Fatto salvo un interesse generale di principio, ognuno ha in più un suo interesse particolare da difendere e si muove di conseguenza. Pensa a tutti i "de profundis" all' F-15 che vari generali dell'USAF avevano intonato prima ancora delle valutazioni tecniche del caso... Ciao Per Paperinik: "Se dico "QUOTO" vale come risposta?!?! " Assolutamente no! Anche tu devi soffrire! Ciao
  2. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    Da Airforcetimes: Repairing F-15s could cost $50 million By Erik Holmes - Staff writer Posted : Friday Feb 29, 2008 7:16:12 EST The Air Force’s F-15 fleet will require about $50 million worth of repairs to replace faulty structural components, Air Force Secretary Michael Wynne said Wednesday. Testifying about the service’s fiscal 2009 budget proposal before the House Armed Services Committee, Wynne said the money will be used for depot maintenance to replace longerons, the metal support beams inside the jets’ forward fuselage that support the cockpit assembly and reinforce the cockpit. Wynne did not say how many aircraft would require the repairs, and he said he is not yet sure whether the repairs will require trips to the F-15 depot at Robins Air Force Base, Ga., or if they could be done between flights by “depot SWAT teams.” Lawmakers on the panel said they are concerned that seven F-15s have crashed in the past nine months, including the Nov. 2 crash of a Missouri Air National Guard F-15C that resulted in nearly the entire F-15 fleet being grounded for more than two months. In that incident, the longeron failed and the aircraft broke in two while on a training flight. The 2009 budget proposal includes $497 million for F-15 repairs, but Wynne did not address how the rest of that money might be spent. Air Force leaders had hoped to put the money toward long-lead items for 20 more F-22s, but the Pentagon rejected that idea after the F-15 problems surfaced. Non capisco... Non hanno appena rimesso in volo gli F-15 senza restrizioni (eccetto i famosi 9)? I longheroni "sottili" sono da sostituire o no? E dopo tutti gli esami del caso non si sa nemmeno quanti longheroni sono da sostituire? Che posso dire, io continuo a sentire puzza di bruciato... Ciao
  3. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    Da Airforcetimes: Investigators look for debris from F-15 crash By Melissa Nelson - The Associated Press Posted : Friday Feb 22, 2008 10:58:24 EST PENSACOLA, Fla. — Eglin Air Force Base halted training flights for its F-15 pilots Thursday and investigators searched for wreckage from a midair crash that killed one pilot and downed two jets over the Gulf of Mexico a day earlier. The pilot’s family was notified of his death Wednesday evening, said Sgt. Bryan Franks. Neither that man’s name nor the name of a second pilot who survived the crash has been released. On Thursday the more than 80 pilots and hundreds of airmen at Eglin’s 33rd Fighter Wing were mourning the fallen pilot, Franks said. “Anytime we conduct flight operations, we do it as a team. We are all feeling the affects of this as a team, as one,” Franks said. Both pilots ejected from their single-seat F-15C Eagles after the collision and were located by rescuers Wednesday evening. The surviving pilot was out of the hospital in good condition on Thursday. The cause of the collision about 35 miles south of Tyndall Air Force Base in the Florida Panhandle was not immediately known, officials said. An Air Force board is investigating. Weather in the area was clear on Wednesday. Heavy rain moved in Thursday. The jets were doing a routine air-combat training exercise, when they apparently collided in mid-air, Col. Todd Harmer, commander of the 33rd Training Wing said. Both pilots had been with the 33rd Fighter Wing “for quite some time,” Harmer said. After the crash, a Coast Guard rescue jet located the pilot who survived and radioed the location to The Nina, a commercial snapper and grouper fishing boat, which picked him up. Thomas Niquet, the boat’s captain, said he found the man in the middle of an oil slick after the boat passed through some of the crash debris. “He was able to talk to us, but he was weak. He had his vest on and it was inflated, his parachute was right there by him. He had been there in the water for quite awhile, but he didn’t have any injuries,” Niquet said. “He wanted some water and we covered him up with a blanket. He was worried a lot about the other pilot,” he said. That pilot told rescuers he saw the other pilot eject but lost him in the clouds. He told them the approximate location for the second pilot, who was found by a Coast Guard helicopter. The Air Force grounded all of its F-15s — nearly 700 — after the catastrophic failure of an F-15C during a routine training flight in Missouri in November. The pilot safely ejected. Most were back in service by January, but others were grounded indefinitely after defects were found. The Air Force began using the F-15C in 1979. The planes, built by McDonnell Douglas Corp., were deployed to the Persian Gulf in 1991 in support of Operation Desert Storm and have since been used in Iraq, Turkey and Bosnia. The planes can fly as high as 65,000 feet, and each costs about $30 million, according to the Air Force. An F-15C crashed after a mid-air collision with an F-16 during a training exercise near Anchorage, Alaska, in June. Military officials said it appeared the F-15 clipped the F-16’s wing. The F-15 pilot ejected and did not have serious injuries. The F-16 landed safely. Anando leggermente OT, segnalo che anche i B2 sono stati messi a terra dopo l'incidente di Guam: un articolo qui: http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2008/02/..._crash_022608w/ In questo caso nessun complotto: ogni aereo che cade causa una perdita del 5% della flotta e di un paio di miliardi di dollari (oltre ai rischi per il pilota...). Ottime ragioni per un po' di cautela. Ciao
  4. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    Come sospettavo il comunicato del post precedente dimenticava di dire che rimangono a terra gli F-15 con le cricche. Gli altri andranno in volo e verranno periodicamente controllati. La cosa messa così ha un po' più senso. Ecco il comunicato: "ACC issues latest release from stand down for F-15s by ACC Public Affairs 2/15/2008 - LANGLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Va. -- Gen. John D.W. Corley, commander, Air Combat Command, returned 149 grounded F-15s to flight today contingent upon the completion of customized inspections on each of the aircraft's longerons. This "stand-down release" order brings the total number of cleared A, B, C and D-model F-15 aircraft to 429. Nine aircraft, however, will remain grounded due to cracked longerons, the critical support structures that run along the length and side of the aircraft. Today's ACC release directly applies to ACC F-15 A-D aircraft. ACC also recommends the release and return to flying status of F-15 A-D aircraft assigned to the Air National Guard, Pacific Air Forces, United States Air Forces in Europe, Air Education and Training Command and Air Force Materiel Command. The F-15s are cleared after the completion of any necessary and previously ordered inspections, follow-on engineering technical reviews on each aircraft longeron and any associated repair actions. The recommendation to return these aircraft to flying status is based on assessments performed by the engineering staff at Warner Robins Air Logistics Center with technical assistance provided by industry partners and the Air Force Research Laboratories. Warner Robins ALC F-15 Systems Program Manager created the Time Compliance Technical Order Inspections that each F-15 A-D aircraft have to complete before returning to flight. In addition to the TCTOs, additional inspections are required via an Engineering Technical Assistance Request process. The purpose of the ETAR inspections is to validate unique discrepancies at specific locations on any given aircraft longeron among those aircraft recommended for release. These are tailored inspections, which are tail-number unique, and are directed via the ETAR process. Once the ETAR inspections are complete, and TCTOs have been completed, the aircraft may return to flying status. On Tuesday, General Bruce Carlson, AFMC commander, approved the report of an Independent Review Team, which endorsed WR-ALC plans for releasing aircraft after an extensive analytical investigation. Subsequently, today, Maj. Gen. Thomas J. Owen, WR-ALC Commander, recommended that F-15s with longerons not meeting specifications but, which have passed all previous published TCTOs and do not have cracks, be returned to flight. The Warner Robins ALC F-15 SPM has developed additional fleet-wide recurring inspection requirements for the F-15 A-D model longerons, which will account for individual aircraft usage severity, part thickness variations and other factors as required. "The priority in returning these F-15s to flight is to provide combat power for the defense of our nation and, particularly, as an essential component to our nation's alert force," said General Corley. "After careful review of engineering data and upon the recommendation from both military and industry experts, I believe we can release and return our F-15s to their important air superiority mission." The F-15s were first grounded after a Nov. 2 mishap when an F-15 C assigned to the Missouri Air National Guard broke in half due to the failure of the upper right longeron. Based on data recovered by the Accident Investigation Board investigating that mishap, and from engineers at the WR-ALC, aircraft were found to have cracks in their longerons, which resulted in the grounding of the entire fleet until appropriate inspections and evaluations could be accomplished. On Jan. 9, Air Combat Command cleared approximately 60 percent of its F-15 A-D model aircraft for flight and recommended a limited return to flight for Air Force units worldwide. This decision followed engineering risk assessments and data received from multiple fleet-wide inspections. At that time, it was determined that 40 percent of the F-15 A-D model fleet's longerons did not meet manufacturing specifications. " Purtroppo in questi giorni di chiusura del forum è avvenuto uno scontro tra due F-15 con il decesso di uno dei piloti. Un pensiero a chi non c'è più e alla sua famiglia. Ciao
  5. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    Da Dedalonews "Tornano in volo gli F-15 Il generale John Corley ha ordinato il ritorno in volo degli F-15 senza restrizioni e ha suggerito che tutti i comandi che utilizzano questo velivolo facciano altrettanto. Gran parte della flotta di F-15 è a terra dal 2 novembre scorso, quando uno di questi velivoli si spezzò per una cricca su un longherone durante un volo di addestramento. Dalle indagini emerse che i longheroni delle serie A-d sono più sottili rispetto alle specifiche, ma le ispezioni effettuate, secondo Corley, garantirebbero una ripresa sicura dei voli." Se la notizia è vera i casi possono essere solo due: o sono complottisti ai massimi livelli, con le cricche pericolosissime e tutto il resto, oppure sono pazzi furiosi. Indovinate quale delle due sceglierei.... Ciao
  6. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    Ok prendo atto... Se tecnicamente la cosa è così poco conveniente, mi rendo conto che lo sforzo sarebbe eccessivo. Tuttavia la Boeing deve comunque rifondere all'USAF un danno di discreta entità: pensate verrà fatto sotto forma di sconti su aerei nuovi o sulla manutenzione? Ciao
  7. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    Non ho mai pensato che le scelte vengano dettate unicamente da valutazioni politiche o di marketing (ci mancherebbe altro), ma credo fermamente che queste voci, soprattutto quella politica abbiano molta influenza. Accanto all'aspetto tecnico, in ogni scelta effettuata a certi livelli, si affiancano tutta una serie di considerazioni aggiuntive. Si va dalla creazione di posti di lavoro, al dove vengono creati, pensando magari all'influenza di questa zona invece che quella, oppure di Tizio invece che Caio alle prossime elezioni. E' così in tutto il mondo, e negli USA forse è più evidente che altrove anche perchè fare lobby è legale. Il politico di solito ha un modo di pensare più articolato rispetto ad un tecnico. Quest'ultimo fa valutazioni sul piano oggettivo, con dei dati, dei rapporti qualità prezzo, oppure costi efficacia e ne ricava una soluzione ottimale. A lui non interessano luogho di produzione, posti di lavoro o pressioni esterne di qualsivoglia natura. Il politico invece ha un approccio del tutto diverso: deve gestire una serie di spinte in direzioni diverse, pensando ad un interesse più ampio (oltre al suo...). A livello decisionale affianca alle valutazioni tecniche anche quelle "ambientali" e potete star certi che tra una soluzione ottimale sul piano tecnico ma poco vantaggiosa sul piano politico ed una soltanto "buona" a livello tecnico ma valida e spendibile su quello politico, sceglierà sempre la seconda. Il politico inoltre ha l'esigenza di "fare", cioè di creare una serie di novità da poter "vendere" come prova dell'efficienza dimostrata durante il suo mandato. Anche se la soluzione ottimale fosse non fare nulla, sente l'esigenza di lasciare "un segno". Per traslare questo discorso sui nostri F-15, è più che evidente che ordinare tanti F-22 vuol dire fare girare soldi, quindi posti di lavoro, riconoscenza di industrie e relative comunità, plauso dei militari, aumento di prestigio internazionale, quattrini per le prossime elezioni. Tanto i soldi li mettono altri. Oppure a parità di budget saranno necessari dei tagli, da farsi rigorosamente in qeui settori che non sono mai sotto i riflettori. Per capirci definitivamente, ti dico, molto alla buona, come avrei gestito l'"affaire" F-15. Dopo aver messo a terra la flotta (gesto dovuto), avrei accuratamente evitato di dire (o lasciare intendere...) che l'F-15 aveva avuto un cedimento dovuto alla vecchiaia, che era urgente sostituirlo perchè oramai non più in grado di volare e simili... Fatte le verifiche e scoperto il problema, avrei dato la massima enfasi mediatica al fatto che il problema era dovuto al fatto che un longherone era stato mal costruito su alcuni esemplari, e che questa e solo questa era la causa dei problemi. Avrei imposto alla Boeing, che per 40 milioni di dollari non rischia certo il fallimento, di rimediare al suo errore in tempi ragionevoli e avrei soprattutto rassicurato la popolazione che l'F-15 è perfettamente in grado di svolgere il suo ruolo di difesa aerea, sia pure un gradino sotto l'F-22, che come programmato, sostituirà gradualmente gli Eagle nei prossimi anni. Però facendo questo, non avresti attivato la catena di eventi descritta sopra. Che come puoi ben immaginare, è gradita a tante, troppe persone. Ciao
  8. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    A quei tempi frequentavo la 1a dell'istituto tecnico industriale. Ricordo che mi vennero consegnati una lima e un pezzo di metallo da lavorare. Siccome non ero molto bravo a levigare il "pezzo", può anche darsi che abbia asportato più materiale del dovuto... Ma nessuno mi aveva detto che quel pezzo finiva in un F-15... Sono mortificato... Non ho dubbi sul fatto che sostituire i longheroni non è uno scherzo, ma credo comunque sia una procedura più veloce rispetto a costruire un F-22 da zero (non sono un tecnico, quindi correggimi pure se sbaglio). Anzi, sarei curioso di conoscere il tempo necessario per riparare ogni aereo e su quanti aerei è possibile lavorare contemporaneamente (ovviamente usando criteri di buon senso...). Quindi partiamo dal presupposto che 160 aerei mancheranno all'appello per un po' di tempo al di la di ogni altra considerazione. E come ho scritto in precedenza non riesco ha vedere i catastrofici buchi nella difesa aerea USA paventati dalla loro assenza, ma solo un aggravio sul piano logistico (se conoscete pericoli realistici non affrontabili con la flotta residua mettetemi al corrente....). Per quanto riguarda Boeing, certo che chiederei il ripristino a loro spese! Non stiamo parlando di una frizione usurata per la quale ti possono dire che sei tu che non sai guidare! Qui la responsabilità oggettiva è senza dubbio tutta loro e non vedo una ragione su un milione per la quale non dovrebbero attivarsi. Anzi credo proprio dovrebbero rimborsare anche il danno relativo all'F-15 caduto in novembre...Poi che si debbano sbattere un bel po' è palese, ma è un problema tutto loro. A parte il fatto che come dice giustamente Paperinik incrementare (peraltro di poco) la linea di produzione degli F-22 costa, ricordiamoci che per gli F-15 sono previsti ancora 10-15 anni di operatività, che non sono proprio due giorni. Infine, anche se già lo sapete, pensa al dicorso costi: 100 F-22 costano 36 milardi di dollari, che anche negli USA non sono noccioline e se è vero che nel tempo la strada è tracciata, credo che mantenere l'attuale rateo di produzione degli F-22 a 24 annui, risistemando in tempi ragionevoli gli F-15 per fagli terminare la loro vita operativa nei tempi previsti (2020-2025), sia il miglior compromesso tra efficacia della difesa aerea ed esigenze di bilancio. Se poi, si vuole portare il discorso solo sul piano tecnico, mettendo (molto) in secondo piano i costi, non posso che convenire con quanto sostenete tu e Paperinik: ovviamente non c'è storia in un confronto tra un Eagle e un Raptor. Per rispondere alla tua affermazione: ovviamente non mi stupisco che qualcuno pensi ad aerei nuovi piuttosto che tenersi un buco di 160 aerei per poi averli vecchi... Se puoi pagare decine di miliardi di dollari contro zero per avere il meglio non ci sono problemi... Però sappiamo tutti che nella realtà i soldi contano eccome. Ciao
  9. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    Ok, tutto chiaro. Ora vorrei capire bene: così come l'USAF ha trovato normale sostituire le parti dello stabilizzatore, non riesco a vedere il dramma nel sostituire un pezzo, risultato sottodimensionato ripetto al progetto, per di più a spese di Boeing. E inoltre farlo in aerei non operativi in quanto messi comunque a terra. Proprio non ci riesco. Se chi ha realizzato fisicamente i longheroni 25 anni fa non avesse sbagliato, non sarebbe successo nulla e noi probabilmente saremmo qui ad ammirare l'efficenza di un aereo che dopo 30 anni di servizio fa ancora alla grande il suo dovere, anche alle soglie della vecchiaia. Poi, che gli F-15 siano anziani, è palese, che li si voglia far passare da rottami mi pare eccessivo. Ovviamente questa mia valutazione cambierebbe se iniziasserero ad arrivare cedimenti di più elementi correttamente dimensionati per i quali si suppone che siano arrivati al termine della loro vita operativa... Se tutto quello che è stato detto sul longherone incriminato è corretto, non vedo ragioni di sorta per non mantenere l'Eagle in servizio come caccia (ovviamente non di punta) per i prossimi 10-15 anni come previsto. Mi rendo conto che il futuro è del Raptor (che peraltro mi piace molto), ma visti i costi non andrei troppo lontano con la fantasia sui numeri del "supercaccia", almeno nel breve-madio termine. Prevedo al massimo modesti ordini per mantenerne aperta la linea di produzione. Quindi ci andrei molto cauto a pensionare l'Eagle senza validissime ragioni. Per intercettare il 99.9% delle possibili minacce aeree dei prossimi anni va benissimo. Ed è gratis. Ciao
  10. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    Oltre al famigerato longherone, ti risultano altre parti degli F-15 che abbiano dato segni di cedimenti strutturali?
  11. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    Esatto. tu infatti scrivevi Quello che vorrei capire è se i 9 esemplari con le cricche facevano parte di quel 40% con il longherone "sottile" o sono esemplari con il longherone dimensionato come da progetto. Ciao
  12. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    Curioso questo fatto. Si sa se in tutti gli aerei i longheroni hanno la stessa anomalia di quello del disegno?
  13. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    Da "Defense industry daily": Aging F-15s: Ripples Hitting the F-22, F-35 Programs 14-Feb-2008 18:57 EST Related Stories: Americas - USA, Fighters & Attack, Force Structure, Issues - Political, Lobbying, Policy - Procurement F-22 and F-15 (click to view full)Over the last several months, “Aging Aircraft: USAF F-15 Fleet Grounded” has covered the sudden loss of the USAF’s F-15 A-D Eagle fighter fleet, in the wake of an accident in which one of the USAF’s plane’s broke in half in mid-air due to structural fatigue. The ripple effects have been wide-ranging within the existing fighter fleet, as other aircraft were diverted to cover F-15 missions. Pilot re-certification very nearly became a nightmare of its own. The largest effects, however, may play out on the procurement front. If many of the USAF’s F-15s, which were supposed to serve until 2020, must be retired, how should they be replaced? The US Air Force Association’s February 2008 Washington Watch feature details some of the considerations, and ripple effects, underway: “On Dec. 12, 28 Senators and 68 members of the House of Representatives wrote to Pentagon chief Robert M. Gates, urging him to keep buying F-22s, at least through the end of the 2009 Quadrennial Defense Review. They said that, in light of the F-15 groundings and reports indicating that “significantly more than 220” Raptors are needed to fulfill national strategy, ending F-22 production now would be, at best, “ill advised.”.... In late December, Pentagon Comptroller Tina W. Jonas directed USAF to shift $497 million marked for F-22 shutdown costs to fix up the old F-15s instead. The move effectively set the stage for continued F-22 production. Displaying 236 of 732 words / 2 pages Eagle: Sunset claws? (click to view full)....Lockheed Martin has in recent times built F-22s at a rate of 24 a year. The company officials said it would be relatively easy to ramp back up to that figure, and that its facilities could be revamped to reach 32 a year. However, if USAF needed the fighters faster, costs could go up…. Asked to identify the longest-lead item in F-22 production, Lockheed said simply, “titanium.”.... Of the Air Force’s hundreds of F-15s, about 180 F-15A-Ds were supposed to remain in service into the mid-2020s. Replacing them with F-22s – above and beyond the 183 Raptors now planned – would require buying at least 20 a year to be minimally efficient. At that rate, it would take nine extra years of production to replace the F-15 fleet fully. Raise the rate, and replacement time would decrease. At 30 per year, the F-15s could be wholly replaced in six years. However, USAF is also struggling to fund the F-35 fighter. It needs to build 110 per year to replace the F-16 in a timely manner, but can only afford 48 per year in its budget….” It should also be reiterated that even though about 33% of the USAF’s F-15 Eagles remain grounded, the rest have been certified as still fit to fly – albeit with caveats like no flight above Mach 1.5, and restrictions on certain maneuvers outside of actual combat. In light of that fact, why is there so much buzz over fleet replacement, given the additional costs? One of the primary motivations is that there’s no guarantee the F-15A-D fleet won’t suffer from similar mechanical issues in future. Inspections have been performed, but one of the key risks of aging aircraft is unanticipated mechanical issues in places you haven’t looked before. The F-15 accident in Missouri that triggered the multinational grounding was a prime example. Uncertainty has its own costs, and using the F-15 Eagle fleet in ways designed to reduce stress on the airframe even further would create problems of their own. For instance, it would be possible to restrict the F-15A-D fleet to domestic overflight, cruise missile defense, et. al., and hope the lower stress and flying hours can nurse the fleet along. The aircraft’s electronics and armament make them very well suited for that role, even if they’re in marginal flying condition. On the other hand, this course of action would add to the load on other USAF aircraft, and create related personnel issues. The question before US lawmakers boils down to this: are the uncertainties created by the F-15A-D fleet’s condition so great that extra money for proactive early replacement is now necessary – or is the risk of nursing that fleet along considered acceptable, in order to pay for other defense programs? Ciao
  14. belumosi

    F-15 "bare volanti"? Secondo TGCOM...

    Mai pensato nulla del genere!! Quando ho scritto della chiacchierata tra amici, pensavo proprio ad un qualcosa sul tipo di un gruppo di persone animate da una comune passione, che si mettono attorno ad un tavolo (ci starebbe bene una pizza!), per fare quattro chiacchiere. Tutto questo senza alcuna pretesa "utilità o produttività", ma solo il piacere di stare in compagnia con altre persone che amano le ali con le stellette. Ciao!
×