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Tech, Ops Changes Eyed To Cut Bird Strikes

 

Jim Mathews jmathews@aviationweek.com

 

 

FedExBirds_FAA.jpg

 

 

North American bird-strike risk is rising, and consensus is growing that mitigating it depends on a mix of new procedures to make take-offs safer plus new technologies to beef up aircraft and make bird flocks easier to see and avoid.

 

Air traffic worldwide has grown nearly 5%, on average, each year for the past two decades. And a top U.S. bird-strike researcher notes that populations of some of the biggest birds in North America -- eight pounds each or more -- are exploding thanks to aggressive environmental and conservation efforts.

 

Statistically speaking, growing North American bird populations and increasing air traffic can only mean one thing: increasing risk of collisions between birds and aircraft.

 

Citing those growing populations, the answer lies in revisiting airworthiness standards and pressing for new technology, says Richard A. Dolbeer, with the U.S. Agriculture Dept.'s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Wildlife Services.

 

Presenting at AVIATION WEEK's Birdstrike Prevention Forum this week in Chicago, Dolbeer argued for five steps: reevaluating airworthiness standards; focusing wildlife hazard mitigation efforts in and around the airport; evaluating and implementing bird-detecting radar; keeping departure airspeeds under 250 knots below 10,000 feet, and; enhancing aircraft visibility and detectability by birds.

 

Some of these efforts are already underway. Electronics advances now allow low-cost integration of off-the-shelf radar technologies, like those used for small pleasure boats, with fast computers and processors to create low-cost automated radar installations. FAA's Ryan E. King, who leads a bird-strike project for FAA's Airport Technology R&D Team, reported at the Chicago meeting that test radars are in place for evaluation at Seattle Tacoma (SEA), Chicago O'Hare (ORD) and JFK International (JFK), and another installation is under consideration at Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW).

 

Manufacturers say a typical X-band installation can detect small birds reliably up to two miles away on either side of the emitter, as well as 5,000 feet upwards from the radar. Recently, engineers have started incorporating X-band and S-band emitters in the same unit, using the X-band for vertical scanning and the S-band for horizontal searches, giving a more accurate picture of bird activity in the area under surveillance. In this kind of setup, small birds can be found two to three miles away from the installation and some 5,000 feet above it.

 

FAA is studying products from four vendors: the Accipter Avian Radar Detection System, made by Sicom Systems, Ltd.'s Accipter Radar Technologies unit, Merlin, made by DeTect, Inc., GeoMarine, Inc.'s Mars Avian Radar Detection System, and the ROBINLite system developed by a Dutch government-backed R&D arm.

 

Mont Smith, the U.S. Air Transport Association's safety director, echoed Dolbeer's call for slower departures, which minimize the effects of a collision between large birds and aircraft in the one flight regime -- take-off -- blamed for more than 90% of the total hull-loss accidents recorded since 1968 involving bird-strikes. But he noted that today's airspace management strategies don't account for such a procedure.

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Impressionante foto da Airliners.net

 

Gli effetti di un bird-congestion o bird-strike sul motore di un B-737/800 della Continental.

Interessante notare come la gondola motore abbia pienamente assorbito gli effetti derivati dall'impatto.

10qcjk3.jpg

OT: piccione arrosto per cena, siete tutti invitati :rotfl: Fine OT

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Come si suol dire...posto sbagliato al momento sbagliato!

009n.jpg

Opsssss!

 

Accidenti Pap ma è una foto veramente "rappresentativa" del Bird Strike! :rotfl:

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Come si suol dire...posto sbagliato al momento sbagliato!

009n.jpg

Opsssss!

 

Spettacolare! i pesci saranno sotto a fare il tifo per gli aerei, visto che era un pellicano... Ma tu non eri quello un po' sensibile alle immagini crude? :rotfl:

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A 1916 Bird Strike, the First Captured on Film?

 

21bird.cityroom.480.jpg

Even against the backdrop of war, a bird strike was news. The Times said in 1916 that it believed this to be “the first photograph of the capture of a bird in flight by the swifter invention of man.”

 

The inevitable collision of aviation with the avian world has rarely — if ever — been illustrated as thoroughly and dramatically as it was last week. Thanks to news blogs and photo-sharing sites, images of the crippled US Airways Airbus afloat in the Hudson River were available almost immediately worldwide. But it was scarcely the first such encounter to have been recorded pictorially. Not by 93 years, at least.

 

A search of The Times’s photo archive brought to light the arresting image above, published on Oct. 1, 1916 — in the middle of World War I — with the following caption:

 

Remarkable French Official Photograph of a Hawk Overtaken in Flight by a French Military Aeroplane. The smaller bird of prey became entangled in the wires of the aeroplane and was held there until the machine came to earth. As far as known, this is the first photograph of the capture of a bird in flight by the swifter invention of man.

 

That was the beginning and the end of the story in the pages of The Times. Like Captain Chesley B. Sullenberger III of US Airways, the French aviator managed to land safely. To judge from the picture, that hawk appears to have survived the encounter, too, which is more than can be said for the birds that ran afoul of Capt. Sullenberger’s jetliner. (City Room)

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Guardate l'ala di questo aereo :o :o :birdstrike.jpg

 

http://www.damets70.org/picture_library/MSC/BirdStrike.bmp

 

''Birds strike'' :rotfl: :rotfl:

http://lucachittaro.nova100.ilsole24ore.co...rd_strike_2.jpg

Per finire questo:

 

Belgian investigators believe a bird-strike on a Kalitta Air Boeing 747-200 freighter at Brussels Airport triggered the crew to abort take-off at a late stage, causing the jet to overrun and break up.

 

DNA analysis of organic material recovered from the site shows that a kestrel struck the starboard inboard Pratt & Whitney JT9D engine as the aircraft accelerated along the runway on 25 May.

 

Cockpit-voice recorder evidence has revealed that, four seconds after the jet reached the crucial V1 decision speed, there was a loud bang, followed by a loss of power from the engine.

 

Two seconds later - and despite being six seconds past V1 - the crew attempted to abort the take-off. The aircraft failed to stop in the remaining runway length, travelling 300m beyond the end.

 

It broke up and was destroyed but all the crew members, and a passenger on board the service to Bahrain, escaped.

 

http://www.flightglobal.com/assets/getAsse...px?ItemID=23067

 

There were no technical problems with the aircraft, which was carrying 73t of cargo, or the runway condition.

 

Belgium's air accident investigation unit, in an interim statement on the inquiry, says the "likely" cause of the accident was the pilot's decision to execute a post-V1 abort after the ingestion of a bird by the inboard starboard engine.

 

It points out that the crew was highly-experienced: the pilot had accumulated 15,000hr including 3,000hr on 747s.

 

Investigators have suggested that, while the runway-end safety area meets ICAO standards, it could be improved with an arrestor system. The inquiry adds that the risk of bird-strike should be assessed to determine whether bird-control measures at Brussels Airport should be strengthened.

 

 

Edit:non ho letto alcune pagine del topic,se per cas ho messo immagini già postate chiedo scusa :) :)

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GENOVA

 

Avaria costringe solista Frecce Tricolori a rientrare

 

05/06/2009 22:17

 

Una lieve avaria al suo jet ha costretto il solista della Pattuglia Acrobatica Nazionale dell'Aeronautica Militare ad abbandonare l'esibizione delle Frecce Tricolori nel cielo di Genova, oggi pomeriggio, e a rientrare all'aeroporto Cristoforo Colombo. L'avaria si è manifestata subito dopo il primo passaggio sulle navi Costa Pacifica e Costa Luminosa, di cui oggi si è festeggiato il "battesimo" contemporaneo, e non ha messo a repentaglio né il pilota né gli spettatori. I responsabili della Pattuglia Acrobatica non hanno voluto né confermare né smentire la voce raccolta in ambienti aeroportuali, secondo cui l'avaria sarebbe stata provocata dall'urto di un uccello, forse un gabbiano.

 

http://www.primocanale.it/news.php?id=49796

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GENOVA

 

Avaria costringe solista Frecce Tricolori a rientrare

 

05/06/2009 22:17

 

Una lieve avaria al suo jet ha costretto il solista della Pattuglia Acrobatica Nazionale dell'Aeronautica Militare ad abbandonare l'esibizione delle Frecce Tricolori nel cielo di Genova, oggi pomeriggio, e a rientrare all'aeroporto Cristoforo Colombo. L'avaria si è manifestata subito dopo il primo passaggio sulle navi Costa Pacifica e Costa Luminosa, di cui oggi si è festeggiato il "battesimo" contemporaneo, e non ha messo a repentaglio né il pilota né gli spettatori. I responsabili della Pattuglia Acrobatica non hanno voluto né confermare né smentire la voce raccolta in ambienti aeroportuali, secondo cui l'avaria sarebbe stata provocata dall'urto di un uccello, forse un gabbiano.

 

http://www.primocanale.it/news.php?id=49796

 

Accidenti ma questo Tour delle Frecce si sta rivelando "Leggermente" sfortunato! :(

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guardate qui...

tgcom

 

tira delle belle fiammate...

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Accidenti che sfiga però, perdere un Falcon per un volatile! :(

 

Evidentemente fra il Falco e la Cicogna non la spunta nessuno.... :rotfl:

 

Comunque ci sono diversi video riguardanti impatti del genere.

Su youtube ce n'è uno ripreso dall'HUD di un Hawk della RAF...ovviamente l'esito è lo stesso: Eject Eject Eject.

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Mi sa succede spesso.

E' successo anche a Fano, sempre alle Frecce Tricolori qualche anno fà. Ci si è accorti che ne mancava uno (di 339). Aveva "incontrato" un gabbiano poveraccio. Tutto si è risolto con un foro in un'ala e nient'altro. (Il volatile ebbe la peggio).

Edited by Guidocamp

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