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F-35 Lightning II - Discussione Ufficiale

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Molto bello lo spaccato Intruder.

 

Quanto al secondo motore, è una questione politica, a livello operativo semplicemente non serve

Non vorrei sbagliarmi ma lo spaccato non è aggiornato alla nuova configurazione;infatti le Lift Fan Doors sono state sostituite da un unico portello.Quanto alla domanda di Nico ancora non è dato sapere;per la MM la collocazione sarebbe ovviamente Grottaglie,per la vicinanza con Taranto.Per l'AM invece sarebbe Amendola per poter unificare la logistica con i suoi F35B.Tutto sta a vedere come saranno bilanciati i rapporti tra le due FFAA.

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Molto bello lo spaccato Intruder.

 

Quanto al secondo motore, è una questione politica, a livello operativo semplicemente non serve

 

 

Serve per mantenere due motoristi di livello in america e da questo punto di vista uno sforzo lo si potrebbe anche fare.

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A Grottaglie hanno fatto, o stanno per fare, importanti lavori di ampliamento della pista (forse Nico ne sa qualcosa); a meno che l'AMI non riesca a metterci lo zampino li saranno basati gli aerei della Marina. Quanto a quelli dell'AMI onestamente non lo so; sappiamo tutti il motivo per cui sono stati acquistati quindi logica vorrebbe venissero basati insieme agli aerei MMI.

Siccome però credo sia difficile che riescano a far chiudere Grottaglie ho l'impressione che andranno ad Amendola.

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JSF Refocusing On Test-Ready Aircraft

 

Jun 2, 2009

 

 

 

By Graham Warwick aviationweek.com

 

 

F-35AedwardsUSAF.jpg

 

 

 

Joint Strike Fighter officials are refocusing the program on delivering test-ready aircraft following further delays to completing F-35s for development flight-testing.

 

The shift will delay the first flight of aircraft still in production by up to three months, but is expected to enable faster flight-testing to recover some of the slippage.

 

Aircraft were previously being flown once, then grounded for modifications to incorporate design changes resulting from analysis and testing.

 

“There was a lot of emphasis on first flight under past program leadership. The event became important, not the readiness [for testing],” says Doug Pearson, vice president of the F-35 integrated task force.

 

“When there was more work to do on the aircraft, it was added after first flight. And over time, the additions became more than we wished for,” he says. For example, aircraft BF-2 flew once in February and has been in modification since.

 

New JSF program executive officer Brig. Gen. David Heinz has asked Lockheed Martin to study the effect of rephasing the work to accomplish the modifications on assembly before first flight.

 

The ferry flight to the test center at Edwards Air Force Base in California or Naval Air Station Patuxent River in Maryland would become the new programmatic milestone. “We need to get them built, and ready to test, before they fly,” Pearson says.

 

Instead of flying all the development F-35s by year’s end, four of the aircraft would slip into 2010, Heinz says, but Lockheed hopes to recover some of the delay by delivering fully modified aircraft into productive flight-testing.

 

Aircraft BF-1, the first short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) F-35B, is in modification following hover-pit testing and is expected to return to flight by the end of July.

 

After around 12 flights from the Fort Worth, Texas, plant to verify design changes and qualify the aircraft for probe-and-drogue refueling, BF-1 is expected to ferry to Patuxent River at the end of August to begin STOVL “build down” flight-testing.

 

Another 12-20 flights at progressively lower altitudes and speeds are expected to culminate in the first vertical land on the hover pad at Patuxent River in September/October.

 

“I will be surprised if it goes beyond October,” says Pearson, while describing it as an aggressive schedule. “There’s a reasonable chance it will happen before the end of September.”

 

Aircraft BF-2 is due at Patuxent River in September while BF-4, the first F-35 mission-system test aircraft, is expected to arrive by year’s end. BF-3 is a loads aircraft and will go though extensive ground testing before flying.

 

Aircraft AF-1 and -2, the first production-representative conventional takeoff and landing F-35As, will be the next aircraft to fly, Pearson says. They are scheduled for delivery to the Edwards test center in the first quarter of next year.

 

The first F-35C carrier variant, CF-1, is now scheduled to fly on Dec. 23, a slip of three months, with the other two test aircraft following early in 2010. All three will go to Patuxent River.

 

Because of delays, the bulk of the 5,000-plus development flights will now be conducted in 2010 and 2011, but Pearson still expects to complete operational testing in 2014. The original schedule was 2013, but this was extended last year.

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JSF Program Chief Talks Competing Engines

 

By Michael Bruno, aviationweek.com

 

F35-STOVL-LockheedMartin.jpg

 

 

The top Joint Strike Fighter official says he unequivocally supports President Barack Obama’s fiscal 2010 budget request, which does not seek funds for a second JSF engine — but he is still planning for the F136 and suggests Washington consider the risk otherwise.

 

Citing the potential for “competitive advantage” from alternate engines for the single-engine F-35, and noting that there could be an operational risk some day from having just one engine, Marine Corps Brig. Gen. David Heinz told reporters at the JSF Joint Program Office June 2 that there might be considerations beyond the financial cost of funding dual powerplant efforts.

 

“Do we still believe that’s acceptable?” Heinz asked rhetorically.

 

Meantime, the general — selected for his second star after his promotion from deputy program chief — says it would be irresponsible for him not to plan for both engine efforts. “I have to,” he asserts, adding it would be “downright reckless” not to after Congress has earmarked funds for the second engine several times already. And besides, military officials spend a lot of their time planning for things that do not happen, he joked.

 

Heinz explained to the roundtable of reporters that funding development of a second engine from within the existing F-35 budget would cut production by 50 or more aircraft and push up program costs — a point he made to Aviation Week last week (Aerospace DAILY, May 29). But the program executive officer also stressed that economic modeling was difficult, and that a competition for the engines would likely drive down costs.

 

Heinz further asserted that the primary Pratt & Whitney F135 engine has yet to truly compete with the General Electric/Rolls-Royce F136, regardless of what Pratt and some supporters may suggest.

 

Assuming the program’s planned ramp-up and a 50-50 split engine order during the sixth low-rate initial production tranche, fiscal 2013 would be the first genuine year of the rivalry. Such a race could bring technology advancements too, the general notes. “They are just beginning in that competition,” he says.

 

Elsewhere, Heinz said authorities are trying to track down and prosecute those responsible for a cyber breach of the program a few years ago, recently highlighted in news reports. He would not comment further, saying all the publicity does not necessarily help that effort. “We are trying to actually capture a few of these individuals,” he says.

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Alcuni stralci di un'interessante intervista a Jon Beesley, chief test pilot del programma F-35.

 

 

 

 

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Consegnato primo sistema completo CNI per l’F-35 Lightning II

 

 

 

Northrop Grumman ha consegnato a Lockheed Martin il primo sistema integrato CNI (communication, navigation and identification) completo e pronto per il volo a bordo dell’F-35 Lighning II, dopo averne collaudato la sicurezza sulla piattaforma CATBird (Cooperative Avionics Test Bed) ed aver ottenuto il via libera per l’installazione sul JSF. Quando sarà pienamente sviluppato il CNI darà ai piloti dell’F-35 una capacità equivalente alle funzioni fornite da più di 40 sottosistemi convenzionali, consentendo il supporto simultaneo a decine di sistemi critici, riducendo contemporaneamente di molto le dimensioni e il peso del velivolo. Queste funzioni includono Identificazione Friend or Foe (IFF), l’acquisizione automatica delle tappe di volo e le varie comunicazioni vocali e dati per operare efficacemente in ambiente netcentrico, come il Multifunction Advanced Data Link, approvato dall’US Department of Defense per l’uso su tutte le piattaforme a bassa osservabilità.

 

Il software del sistema di comunicazione, navigazione e identificazione ha 500.000 linee di codice e incorpora l’architettura del Joint Tactical Radio System. Ne fanno parte anche ricevitori e trasmettitori UHF/VHF (Ultra High Frequency/Very High Frequency), radar altimetro, transponder IFF, sistema TACAN (tactical air navigation) e programma di diagnostica.

 

L’F-35 Lightning II è un velivolo supersonico multiruolo di quinta generazione con capacità stealth. Il monomotore F-35 è realizzato in tre versioni: CTOL (Conventional Take Off and Landing), STOVL (Short Take Off and Vertical Landing) e CV (Carrier Variant). Le tre versioni dell’F-35 condividono la stessa progettazione e utilizzano la stessa infrastruttura di supporto in tutto il mondo. Il velivolo sostituirà almeno 13 tipi di aerei, inizialmente in 11 paesi.

 

 

 

http://www.difesanews.it/archives/consegna...35-lightning-ii

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Norway To Begin F-35 Negotiations

 

Jun 10, 2009

 

 

 

By Graham Warwick aviationweek.com

 

 

 

 

Norway’s defense ministry is to begin negotiations on the purchase of up to 56 Lockheed Martin F-35As after parliament voted to accept its recommendation of the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) over the Saab Gripen NG.

 

Negotiations are expected to take two years, and the government is required to return to parliament in the spring for authorization to begin negotiating the final contract. Norway is already a partner in the JSF program.

 

Despite an effort by the right-wing Progress Party to send the fighter decision back to the government for further analysis, a majority in parliament voted to endorse the government’s November selection of the F-35.

 

 

http://www.difesanews.it/archives/accordo-...ellnsm-sullf-35

 

The defense ministry does not know when a contract will be signed, or how many aircraft will be ordered, but beginning negotiations this year keeps the program on track to allow first deliveries in 2016 and full operational capability in 2020.

 

Lockheed Martin is planning for Norway to begin buying aircraft in 2014 as part of the eighth low-rate initial production batch. Canada and Denmark also could order their first JSFs at the same time, says Tom Burbage, Lockheed executive vice-president and general manager, F-35 program integration.

 

Denmark is going though a three-step process, first to decide whether it needs a new fighter, then which one, and finally how many and when. The first two decisions were planned before its parliament recesses at the end of this month, but are expected to slip.

 

With a requirement for 48 aircraft, JSF program partner Denmark still is hoping to decide between the F-35A, Gripen NG, and Boeing F/A-18E/F before year-end, Burbage says.

 

Although also a partner in the JSF program, Canada has held its requirement for up to 80 next-generation fighters open to evaluate other candidates, but could now move to a downselect decision this year, Burbage believes.

 

Among the other international JSF partners, the U.K. has ordered its first two test F-35Bs as part of the 17-aircraft third production lot just awarded. A single test F-35A for the Netherlands also is included, but the Dutch will not make a final decision until 2010.

 

A third test aircraft for the U.K. and a second for the Netherlands are planned as part of the 32-aircraft LRIP 4 contract to be awarded next year.

 

Australia has confirmed plans to buy 100 F-35As, beginning with an initial tranche of 75, but has slipped its first purchases by a year to 2012, as part of LRIP 6. Italy, with a requirement for 131 F-35As and Bs, and Turkey, with 100 F-35As, also expected are to begin their purchases in LRIP 6, Burbage says.

 

Lockheed Martin is conducting a study for Spain, which like Italy operates the AV-8B Harrier +, that will look at the F-35 as a replacement for its F-18s. A similar study is planned for Finland.

 

Negotiations continue with Israel on the sale of an initial 25 F-35As. Meeting Tel Aviv’s demand for deliveries by 2014 will require agreement by the end of this year, or early in 2010, he says.

 

 

 

 

Accordo ufficiale per l’integrazione dell’NSM sull’F-35

 

 

f-35_jsm.jpg

 

 

Il Joint Strike Missile, derivazione aviolanciabile del Naval Strike Missile (NSM), verrà ufficialmente integrato sull’F-35 Lightning II in seguito all’accordo tra il produttore Kongsberg e Lockheed Martin. La prima fase dello sviluppo di questa versione del missile per attacchi antinave e contro obiettivi terrestri, finanziato dalla Norvegia e dall’Australia, è in corso e si protrarrà per altri 16 mesi. Le soluzioni ideate per il JSM verranno poi applicate a livello di upgrade sull’NSM.

 

L’accordo comporterà anche un lavoro di coordinazione delle attività di sviluppo delle due società per offrire un prodotto ad alte prestazioni, a basso rischio, capace di sfruttare tutti i vantaggi operativi del JSF.

 

Il missile antinave da 1.000 libbre (454 kg), stealth ed altamente manovrabile JSM ha una portata di 278 km. Condivide con l’NSM l’eqipaggiamento elettronico. La guida è basata su sensori passivi IR con sistema di riconoscimento autonomo dell’obiettivo (Autonomous Target Recognition - ATR) che confronta le immagini acquisite con quelle presenti nel suo database, comunicazioni data link per aggiornamenti in corsa dei dati del bersaglio e sistema di navigazione inerziale e GPS.

 

La Marina Norvegese installerà il Naval Strike Missile a bordo delle nuove fregate ASW (anti-submarine warfare) Classe Nansen, costruite dalla spagnola Navantia, e sui catamarani veloci con caratteristiche stealth Classe Skjold, costruiti dalla locale Umoe Mendal. Il missile verrà inoltre adottato dalla marina polacca per le sue installazioni d’artiglieria costiere.

 

Il JSM potrà essere lanciato dalla baia interna delle versioni A e C dell’F-35, oltre che dalle stazioni esterne, mentre l’integrazione a bordo dei caccia Eurofighter e Gripen è in discussione.

Edited by intruder

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si iniziano già a muovere i primi passi verso l'integrazione di nuove armi che renderanno l'F35 sempre più completo e quindi pronto a sostituire l' F15 e il Tornado

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Quella bestia ci entra e il Meteor no?

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Quella bestia ci entra e il Meteor no?

 

 

Quella bestia è stata studiata sin dall'inizio in prospettiva dell'utilizzo da stive interne, poi il meteor dovrebbero farcelo entrare con un paio di modifiche.

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per me è uno dei migliori, secondo solo al Raptor americano...

 

Cortesemente, cerchiamo di non scadere nella demagogia con interventi del genere! ;)

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Canada Looks to Accelerate F-35 Decision; Lockheed Eyes Consortium Buy

 

www.aviationweek.com

 

 

 

Canada is working to bring forward a decision on its new fighter to later this year, with the Lockheed Martin-led F-35 Joint Strike Fighter facing ostensible competition from the Boeing F/A-18E/F, Eurofighter Typhoon and Saab Gripen NG (Next Generation).

 

"We are trying to advance the decision to 2009," says a Department of National Defense (DND) official. The intent, assuming the F-35 is selected, is to allow Canada to participate in a potential "consortium buy" promising better pricing and industrial rewards.

 

"A consortium buy would allow us to put international aircraft under a longer-term contract in advance of U.S. multi-year procurement," says Tom Burbage, Lockheed's executive vice president and general manager, F-35 program integration. "This would allow us to do some average pricing," to reduce the cost of early production aircraft.

 

Lockheed tried to put together a consortium-buy proposal a year ago - criticized by some as a controversial effort - but Burbage says the supply chain was "up to its ears" negotiating the first three low-rate initial production contracts.

 

"We plan to go back to the supply chain a year from now and negotiate a proposal for Lot 5. Most of the international aircraft come in with Lot 6," he says.

 

Canada is working to get a fighter decision on the cabinet's agenda for later this year. A cabinet go-ahead would allow the DND to submit its plan for procurement of 65 aircraft to Ottawa's treasury board for budget approval.

 

According to the DND official, there are no plans to accelerate the delivery of new fighters, which are planned to begin by 2018 to replace Canada's CF-18s as they are phased out between 2017 and 2020.

 

Canada was the first country to join the United States and the United Kingdom as a partner in development of the JSF, and its industry has significant participation on the program. The original plan was to replace all 80 CF-18s, but "65 is sufficient to do the job," says the official.

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Quella bestia è stata studiata sin dall'inizio in prospettiva dell'utilizzo da stive interne, poi il meteor dovrebbero farcelo entrare con un paio di modifiche.

 

Ho letto ( mi sembra su RID) che si sta cercando di mettere tutti i sensori dell' AARGM all' interno del Meteor per farlo stare nelle baie dell' F-35, poiche' date le dimensioni non si potrebbe far altro che agganciarlo all' esterno ( e in una missione SEAD perdere la stealthness non e' una bella cosa) sapete qualcosa di piu' ?

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Ho letto ( mi sembra su RID) che si sta cercando di mettere tutti i sensori dell' AARGM all' interno del Meteor per farlo stare nelle baie dell' F-35, poiche' date le dimensioni non si potrebbe far altro che agganciarlo all' esterno ( e in una missione SEAD perdere la stealthness non e' una bella cosa) sapete qualcosa di piu' ?

 

 

Forse ti sei confuso con lo slammer ;)

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si è anche pensato ad un missile nuovo... con le dimensioni dell'amraam

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Forse ti sei confuso con lo slammer ;)

Su RID si fa riferimento proprio al Meteor nel senso che nel 2005 da parte italiana erano stati avviati contatti per sviluppare una apposita versione e a tal proposito si dice che il seeker sarebbe perfettamente compatibile con il missile europeo.

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faccio una domanda che magari sarà già stata fatta un milione di volte...

L'italia aveva deciso di non prendere F-35...per caso ha cambiato idea?

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Guest intruder
faccio una domanda che magari sarà già stata fatta un milione di volte...

L'italia aveva deciso di non prendere F-35...per caso ha cambiato idea?

 

 

Ma se ne dovrebbe prendere un centinaio...

 

 

EDIT: 131 per la cronaca.

Edited by intruder

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ah ok...tempo fa Vortex mi passo questo LINK messaggio n°60...

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e quindi? il post parla della rinuncia del primo JSF, il prototipo per divertircisi su, non della rinuncia a tutti i JSF.

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e quindi? il post parla della rinuncia del primo JSF, il prototipo per divertircisi su, non della rinuncia a tutti i JSF.

ah ok grazie Vortex...avevo capito che non ne prendeva più...

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Su RID si fa riferimento proprio al Meteor nel senso che nel 2005 da parte italiana erano stati avviati contatti per sviluppare una apposita versione e a tal proposito si dice che il seeker sarebbe perfettamente compatibile con il missile europeo.

Grazie per l'aiuto... :adorazione:

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