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Request for Information (RFI) regarding submarine capability beyond 2020 has been forwarded to shipyards

 

 

- Our current submarines will reach the end of their service life after 2020. I am therefore very pleased that the process that will eventually allow us to decide on how to best secure the continuation of a Norwegian submarine capability beyond this point is progressing according to schedule, says Norwegian Minister of Defence Anne-Grete Strøm-Erichsen.

 

From 2007 to 2011 a study was carried out by the Norwegian Ministry of Defence to determine whether Norway would continue to have a requirement for a submarine capability after 2020. The study concluded that Norway indeed had such a requirement, and that no other system would be able to replace the capability that is offered by a modern fleet of submarines. A decision was therefore made to look for alternatives for maintaining a Norwegian submarine capability beyond 2020. A second process is now in motion that seeks to develop a basis for deciding between a further life extension of the current inventory, a replacement program, or a combination of the two. This process is expected to present its recommendations in 2014. The chosen solution will then form the basis for a project definition phase before any investment project is presented for the Norwegian parliament, which is planned to happen within 2017.

 

- The strategic significance of maintaining an independent and unique submarine fleet is emphasized by both political and military leadership of the Armed Forces, says Mrs Strøm-Erichsen.

 

As part of the effort leading up to the next decision point in 2014, the Norwegian Defence Logistics Organisation (NDLO) on 11 september 2012 forwarded a “Request for Information” (RFI) to a number of prequalified shipyards. These include DCNS (France), Fincantieri (Italy), Navantia (Spain), ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (representing Kockums AB, Sweden and HDW, Germany) and Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME, South Korea). The purpose of the RFI is to investigate investment cost, life cycle costs, production time, performance and other important aspects related to new submarines that in turn will shape a decision on life extension or fleet replacement. Responses to this RFI are expected by the end of this year.

 

In parallel with the effort to better understand the different aspects related to the procurement of new submarines, the MoD project group is also working on identifying feasibility aspects, cost and uncertainties associated with a service life extension of the current Ula-class. External expertise, both domestic and international, has been engaged in producing inputs to this part of the process.

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Ula-Tech: Norway’s Next Submarine Fleet

 

Norway’s 6 Ula Class/ U210 diesel-electric submarines were commissioned from 1989-1992, and play an important role in their overall fleet. The 1,150t design combined German design, sonar, and torpedoes with a French Thomson-CSF (now Thales) Sintra flank array sonar. Integration happens through a Kongsberg combat system, which has become a mainstay for German submarine types. The submarines are a bit on the small side compared to more modern diesel-electric boats, but remain well suited to Norway’s long coasts and narrow fjords.

The Ula Class has received a number of upgrades since 2006. A new combat system, added cooling for warm water operations, upgraded periscopes, sonar improvements, TADIL-A/Link 11 communications, etc. Even so, the continuous cycle of compression and release inherent in submarine operations will make operations past 2020 a risky proposition. Norway wants to keep a submarine fleet, and is trying to decide what to do.

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The chosen solution will form the basis for a project definition phase, before any investment project is presented for the Norwegian parliament in 2017.

... vedi post precedente

 

 

 

... e qui un link sulla Marina norvegese Norwegian Navy

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DCNS and its Norwegian partners deliver the fifth Skjold FPB to Norwegian Navy

 

DCNS delivered the fifth-of-class fast patrol boat (FPB) P965-Gnist to the Royal Norwegian Navy. The six-boat Skjold program is led by a consortium comprising DCNS and two Norwegian contractors with DCNS acting as the combat system design authority and co- supplier. The naming ceremony of Gnist took place at Umoe yard in Mandal last week.

 

The Norwegian authorities entrusted the Skjold program to a consortium of three contractors with DCNS as the combat system design authority and co-supplier. DCNS is working with Norwegian contractors Umoe Mandal and Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace, through the Skjold Prime Consortium.

 

Skjold FPBs are designed specifically for maritime security and safety missions in Norway’s littoral waters. The combat system is tailored to demanding environments and reduced crewing. The communications and sensor suites are fully compatible with active participation in international and NATO-led operations. The vessels communication capabilities will be further enhanced as they will be upgraded with a state-of-the-art satellite communications system.

 

With a length of around 50 meters, Skjold-class FPBs are heavily armed for their size. The combat system features eight anti-ship missiles and a 76-mm gun that can engage several targets at once at ranges exceeding 12 kilometers.

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Ula-class subs potential easy pickings, former military man claims

 

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“The oldest [one] is 25 years old”, Rear Admiral Jan Gerhard Jæger (ret.) tells Aftenposten, “they undergo upgrades, but the ‘signature’ (identity) they leave behind in the sea remains unchanged.”

Norway’s six Ula-class submarines, all based at Bergen’s Haakonsvern Naval Base, western Norway, were ordered in the ‘70s during the Cold War. These replace the then ageing Kobben-class ones.

The Ula-class submarines were a multinational cooperation on behalf of the Royal Norwegian Navy. The hull sections were produced in Norway, and German company Thyssen Nordseewerke in Emden assembled them.

Norway’s Kongsberg Group built their combat systems, Germany the attack sonar, and the flank sonars are French-made. The vessels were delivered between 1989 and 1992.

Upgrades have been performed on the periscope as part of modernisation work to keep them in service until 2020. These are also currently being carried out on the hull, propulsion, and integrated ships systems.

Installation of new electronic warfare support measures and communication equipment (TADIL-A/Link 11) is part of the programme too, with ongoing work on the weapons control, sonar, and decision support systems, among other things.

TADIL-A/Link 11, a NATO-employed secure half-duplex radio link, can be used on High Frequency (HF) or Ultra High Frequency (UHF).

It is mainly for exchanging digital information such as radar tracking among shipboard, airborne, or land-based tactical data systems.

According to Norwegian Royal Navy information, the Ula-class submarines “makes it possible to operate in the entire maritime domain, including under water.”

“The vessels can operate undisclosed over longer periods of time. They are hard to detect and has the ability tie up significant hostile resources.”

 

“World-class”

“Norway currently has equipment that can be used to trace these submarines. Consequently, we must reckon with the fact that others also possess this,” says Rear Admiral Jan Gerhard Jæger (ret.) to Aftenposten.

49-year-old Commander Solveig Krey has just assumed leadership of the Norwegian Royal Navy’s submarine service.

According to her, the retired Rear Admiral “is making claims on his own behalf.”

“The vessels are currently being upgraded to ensure they are relevant to the tasks they will be solving until 2020”, she stated, “[...] We’re world class when it comes to conventional submarines.”

“They can operate hidden and surface vessels cannot discover them easily. Nevertheless, technology for surface vessels and submarines has developed, meaning these need updating.”

Commander Krey tells The Foreigner Norway upgrading the submarines “is not different to what other countries do.”

The Ula-class submarines are 59 metres long, 5.4 metres wide, and 4.5 metres deep (about 193.5 by 17.7 by 15 feet).

Speeds are 11 knots surfaced and 23 knots submerged, with capacity for a crew of 21+.

“It’s a potent conventional submarine,” Navy press spokesperson Commander Nils Kristian Haugen says.

No decision regarding new submarine purchase has been made, the military’s Colonel Dag Rist Aamoth explains, “But there is an ongoing project looking at possible Ula-class end-of-life replacement or a further upgrade and life extension of the submarine.”

Norway's Ministry of Defence has published this statement after the above article on The Foreigner.

 

 

ecco la replica del Ministero della Difesa Request for Information (RFI) regarding submarine capability beyond 2020 has been forwarded to shipyards

 

Our current submarines will reach the end of their service life after 2020. I am therefore very pleased that the process that will eventually allow us to decide on how to best secure the continuation of a Norwegian submarine capability beyond this point is progressing according to schedule, says Norwegian Minister of Defence Anne-Grete Strøm-Erichsen.

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Replies from the industry to Request for Information (RFI) regarding submarine capability beyond 2020 has been received

 

Norway's six Ula class submarines will reach the end of their service life after 2020. An ongoing study led by the Ministry of Defence (MoD) is producing a basis for the decision between a life extension of the Ula class, a replacement program, or a combination of the two. The recommendation will be presented in 2014. The chosen solution will then form the basis for a project definition phase before an investment project is presented for the Norwegian Parliament, which is planned to happen within 2017.

The study is proceeding according to plan. The Norwegian Defence Logistics Organisation (NDLO) has just received replies to a “Request for Information” (RFI) issued in September 2012 to a number of prequalified shipyards. These include DCNS (France), Fincantieri (Italy), Navantia (Spain), ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (representing Kockums AB, Sweden and HDW, Germany) and Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME, South Korea).

The shipyards have answered the RFI by sending answers and required documentation to the NDLO. In February 2013, representatives from the shipyards will come to Norway to present and clarify their responses as necessary. The responses and the documentation will be thoroughly reviewed and analyzed over the course of the next six months. Based on the information received, the MoD will produce a detailed overview of costs, performance, production time and other important aspects related to a potential procurement of new submarines.

The information provided by the industry is just one of several important steps in the process of producing a basis for the decision between a life extension program and new submarines. In addition, the MoD is engaged in discussions with other nations in order to identify if there is any potential for cooperation. Material cooperation with other nations can produce significant cost saving and synergies, and is an integrated part of the process. In the months ahead, life extension of the Ula-class will be studied and analyzed in detail as well. Thereafter, the two main alternatives will be subject to thorough comparison and evaluation before a recommendation can be presented to the government in 2014.

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La settimana scorsa è scaduto il termine per partecipare alla gara per la fornitura di una nave logistica per la Reale marina norvegese. Si chiede una nave di ca 155 m di lunghezza, con un dislocamento di ca. 15'000 tonn, da consegnare entro il 2016.

Fonti spagnole indicano i seguenti partecipanti:

Cantieri Bergen

Navantia

DCNS Francia

Fincantieri

DSME (Corea del sud)

Hyunday (Corea del sud)

 

www.meretmarine.com

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La notizia non è proprio recentissima ma a inizio luglio 2013 la Norvegia ha scelto i cantieri sudcoreani DSME/Daewoo per la fornitura di una nave logistica nell'ottobre 2016. La vittoria del Paese dell'Estremo oriente sembra essere stata facilitata dalla migliore offerta in termini di costo: 211 milioni di USD.

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Aggiorno la discussione con un resoconto dell’incidente della fregata norvegese di cui probabilmente tutti sappiamo. 

 

https://www.google.it/amp/amp.timeinc.net/thedrive/the-war-zone/24887/stricken-norweigan-frigate-has-almost-completely-sunk-after-its-anchor-wires-snapped%3fsource=dam

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Non saprei se sia più ridicola la dinamica dell'incidente in se o piuttosto il successivo affondamento della nave. L'unica cosa certa è che 1/5 della flotta norvegese d'altura è affondato per palese inettitudine.

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