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Un nanosatellite da Israele

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Il primo nanosatellite israeliano sara' lanciato in orbita verso la meta' del 2009 dal centro spaziale indiano di Satish Dhawan.'Sara' un prodotto di avanguardia tecnologica' ha previsto Raz Tamir, direttore dell'Associazione israeliana dei nanosatelliti (Insa). Questo tipo di satellite Gps, scrive la stampa, costera' 150mila dlr e avra' un peso massimo di 10 kg. Il suo lancio sara' piu' economico di quello dei satelliti standard di tipo Leo, la cui produzione costa 15 mln di dlr.

 

http://www.ansa.it/site/notizie/awnplus/mo..._130255704.html

 

 

 

Israel's close-knit space community is gearing up for something big - and it's really small. The Israel Nanosatellite Association (INSA) is planning a first launch of two small satellites sometime between July and September 2009, most likely from the launch pad at the Satish Dhawan Space Center in Sriharikota, India. "This will be a proof-of-concept for new Israeli satellite technologies," says Dr. Raz Tamir, head of INSA and of Israel Aerospace Industries-MBT's newly minted nanosatellite department.

 

 

It will also make the case for the nanosatellite as a cost-effective alternative to its larger cousins. As the name implies, nanosatellites are small satellites with a mass between one and 10 kg (2.2-22 lb), designed to work in formation. Cheap to build and to launch, a constellation of 60 low-earth orbit (LEO) nanosats can cover the earth.

 

Because a nanosatellite is significantly lighter, several can be launched at a time - at a cost of about $150,000 per satellite, as compared with $15 million per launch of a single regular LEO satellite. Boeing is the only large aerospace company that has actually built and launched a testbed nanosatellite, Tamir tells ISRAEL21c, and to date, no nanosatellite constellation has yet been launched into orbit. But INSA has plans to change all that.

 

INSA is a registered non-profit organization comprising professionals from Israel's academic, commercial and industrial sectors. The organization's stated goals include developing nanosatellite technology in Israel; developing and maintaining Israel's qualitative advantage in space; and activities include presenting technology in an educational context; and designing a nanosatellite that will serve as the basis for future space missions.

 

http://insa.netquire.com/

 

 

 

 

Ovviamente cercherò di saperne qualcosa in più e di postare altre notizie appena le troverò.

Edited by intruder

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progetto interessante...speriamo che anche le altre agenzie spaziali seguono l'esempio israeliano...

dato il suo poco peso verrà lanciato con un vettore speciale?

Edited by F-14

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Guest intruder
progetto interessante...speriamo che anche le altre agenzie spaziali seguono l'esempio israeliano...

dato il suo poco peso verrà lanciato con un vettore speciale?

 

 

Credo di sì, comunque appena ne so qualcosa di più, lo posto.

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Guest intruder

David Eshel/Tel Aviv

www.aviatonweek.com

 

 

Satellite reconnaissance that delivers timely intelligence and strategic communications has become an essential part of national security for many nations, providing early warning of hostile attacks and extending command and control throughout areas of operation.

 

Most nations, particularly small countries, lack the resources, technology and money to create and maintain constellations of orbiting satellites. Smaller, less-costly satellites weighing 500 kg. (1,100 lb.) or less are emerging as practical options. In recent years, large countries, including the U.S. (see p. 36), as well as small ones have recognized the benefits of these platforms.

 

There are four categories of small satellites: Minisatellites weigh 100-500 kg.; microsatellites 10-100 kg.; nanosatellites 1-10 kg.; and picosatellites 0.1-1 kg. Mini- and microsatellites are becoming more common in space programs, for the advantages they provide in speedy launch schedules and economy. Nanosatellites are beginning to be tested and deployed, while picosatellites are largely experimental.

 

One nation that is actively developing small satellites is Israel, which has maintained an indigenous space capability since 1988. Satellite surveillance is particularly critical for Israel, which faces strategic threats from hostile neighbors and from countries as far away as Iran.

 

Israel's satellite program uses Shavit launch vehicles built by Israel Aerospace Industries' (IAI) MLM Div. This missile derivative has three solid-fuel stages and a liquid-fuel stage to lift satellites of 300-350 kg. to retrograde (westward) orbits.

 

Israel's location on the eastern Mediterranean poses disadvantages for satellite launches, since the Shavit can only be launched westward away from the airspace of neighboring countries. Payload capacity of the Shavit is limited to 300-350 kg., so all of Israel's self-launched imaging satellites are minisatellites. (Larger satellites can be launched on Russian or Indian rockets in those countries.)

 

Turning this to an advantage, scientists have embarked on a satellite development program that not only meets the needs of Israel for surveillance, reconnaissance and rapid deployment but similar needs of small nations. The scientists' main contribution has been in miniaturization. Lighter satellites are also more efficient to operate and significantly reduce launching costs.

 

Minisatellites serve Israel well but the space program is looking at more sophisticated concepts. One calls for launching microsatellites into low Earth orbit in constellations that would provide continuous target coverage. These vehicles will be lofted on demand by rockets carrying single or multiple satellites. Scientists are studying the characteristics that will be required to achieve this, including electronic and electromechanical miniaturization, ion-driven thrusters, lightweight structures, laser communication and compact imaging.

 

Aerial launch is an option for microsatellites that is also being considered. IAI has done a study and performed initial wind tests to verify design models involving several launch concepts: Dropping a Shavit satellite launcher from the back of a military transport jet (IAI looked at the Ilyushin Il-76 for this); launching a two-stage Shavit derivative from the back of a civilian jetliner; and lofting a microsatellite placed on the tip of a launcher carried by an F-15. Rafael already operates the Blue Sparrow target missile warhead, which could be the baseline for such a launcher.

 

Released from a high-flying aircraft like the F-15, a launcher's efficiency increases substantially due to lower air density. Moreover, it would cost less than a ground launch. An aircraft can launch a satellite wherever it is required, even in the hostile eastbound direction, provided that the mission is planned correctly. A major tactical advantage of aerial launching is rapid deployment at short notice with minimum ground preparations.

 

 

L'articolo è molto lungo, consiglio di andarsi a leggere il resto qui: AW&ST

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